Tag Archives: USC

Divestment, Activism, and Voice III

Unbeknownst to me, on the day that the faculty published their letter about the university’s role in sweatshops in Bangladesh the students who were concerned about the issue decided to stage a sit-down protest outside of the president’s office. They wanted to talk with the President. The university went into overdrive. Department of Public Safety […]

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Divestment, Activism, and Voice II

Last spring there was discussion about the need for ‘SC to stop doing business with companies that work in Bangladesh. I was asked by a variety of different individuals and groups to sign one or another letter. Before I sign on to things I feel that I need to do my homework and in a […]

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Where’s Rieber Hall?

Late one night last fall, I ended up driving through the UCLA campus after the LA Metro Transportation Authority, Caltrans, and Kiewit decided to reroute me and other drivers off the 405 freeway for the one-millionth time in the last five years, but I digress. I attended UCLA as an undergrad and then worked as […]

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In Honor of William B. Michael—Can We Deconstruct a College Education Statistically?

It doesn’t seem right that another September is upon us and Bill Michael (William B. Michael) is not ambling slowly through Waite Phillips Hall, ready to at once terrorize and fascinate wary graduate students required to learn something about research methods and statistics. A giant in the field, Bill would constantly regale his nervous students […]

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You’ve Written (or Are Writing) a Dissertation … So What?

We talk so much about research questions—what qualifies as a good question, whether the question implies a certain research methodology, what are the right words to use, etc. Yet, at the end of the day there’s one question that trumps even the research question(s). It is important to ask … so what? What’s significant about […]

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Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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The Revolution is Now?

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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A Research Agenda for For-Profit Colleges and Universities

At first glance, the topic of a research agenda for for-profit institutions may seem to be a rather narrow, technical issue, of concern largely to those closely affiliated with those institutions—at most, some of those who work in them, who regulate them, who study them, and maybe even some of those who take courses in […]

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Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

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Is Education Loan Debt Really a Return on Investment (ROI)?

Once again it is the time of year when graduates across the country proudly don their caps and gowns and march across the stage to pomp and circumstance to receive their hard earned degrees. These degrees are then followed up by the first student loan bills, which will require hard earned cash to pay back. […]

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