Tag Archives: Tenure

Getting on (Tenure) Track

Effective June 30th, I’ll be a Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Higher Education at UC Riverside.  As I prepare for this reality, I’ve started receiving and sorting through a lot of advice.  Here I share 5 points that I plan to adhere to in no particular order. 1. To write is right The most popular […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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Postdoc Also Means Pre-Job

As I wrote about over the summer, I started as a UC Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Scholar in the Graduate School of Education at UC Riverside. Since the fall is application season and since I’ve been at UCR almost three months now, I figured it would be useful to share a little about the program and what I’ve […]

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Summing Up – I

I’ve been doing this blog for over half a decade.  At some point what was irregular in the writing of it, became regular; rather than write a blog every now and then we put out a blog a day.  Various folks in the Pullias Center helped staff and write for it.  We cooked up special […]

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Requiem for Tenure and Shared Governance at the University of Wisconsin?

Over the past few weeks, I have condemned the treatment of University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones by the Mississippi Board of Trustees, questioned the efficacy of standardized testing and university ranking systems, and even criticized my own university for its handling of graduate students in the Roski School MFA program.  With my advisor (Bill […]

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When Entrepreneurialism “Disrupts” Academic and Artistic Rigor

Imagine, for a moment, the following scenario: A department of economics, with an internationally-respected, highly-selective graduate program that provides full funding for PhD students, receives a $70 million donation from a capital venture fund.  The donation, introduced by prominent figures from the financial investment world (perhaps Robert Kraft or James Dimon), is earmarked for the […]

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On Academic Life: The End of the Circle

It was not long ago (in my mind, anyway) that I entered graduate school, earned my doctorate, and began a career as an academic. I did not have a clue as to where the journey would take me…and I suddenly find myself nearing the end of that journey. In previous posts I tried to point […]

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On Academic Life: For Those Starting Out

This post is aimed at those who want to pursue an academic career. Most likely, that decision will be an intentional and well thought-out move, unlike the more or less random way that I fell in to academia. In any case, at this point, nearing the end of my academic career, there are some things […]

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On Academic Life: Figuring Out Who You Are

Identity is a crucial issue in terms of development. At some point, everyone has to ask themselves, “Who am I?” A simple question, but an exceedingly complex one at the same time. This question is relevant to any career choice, including being an academic – at least it was for me. I think it has […]

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On Academic Life: You Didn’t Really Do It On Your Own

I often wonder how fate has intervened at various times in my career to lead me to where I am today. For example, I often think about the possibility that I might have ended up working in the mines of northern Mexico in the state of Durango, where my father was born sometime around 1917. […]

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