Tag Archives: Tenure

Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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I Read This and You Don’t Need To: How Universities Work

John Lombardi has a long and distinguished career as a successful, argumentative university president at the University of Massachusetts, University of Florida, and Louisiana State. He has penned a short, incisive book, How Universities Work, that ultimately fails because he hasn’t answered the question every author must ask: Who will read this book? The small […]

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10 things I wish all professors knew

I got my PhD in 1984.  During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators.  I’ve seen different individuals and groups as ‘research subjects’ as students, colleagues, and as friends.  I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense.  By no means is this everything […]

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10 things I wish all associate professors knew

I got my PhD in 1984.  During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators.  I’ve seen different individuals and groups as “research subjects” as students, colleagues, and as friends.  I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense.  By no means is this everything […]

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A Remembrance of Things Past

Yvonna S. Lincoln is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education and Program Chair of the Higher Education Administration Program at Texas A&M University. When you’re asked to remember how things were when you first entered the professoriate, that’s when you understand that you were born right after the flood. There are, however, in thoughtful retrospect, many changes, […]

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On Rejection

Kurt Vonnegut once said to a group of eager writing students, “Probably all of you are good enough to make it as writers. But it’s likely that only one of you has what it takes to endure the constant rejection.” I’m not sure I would reduce academic life to such a straightforward statement, but he’s […]

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Have Ph.D. … Will Travel—Part II

Because newly-minted Ph.D. graduates far outweigh the number of tenure-track positions [read about the sobering statistics here], many will have to travel if they want a job in academia. From my own experiences with friends and colleagues, graduate students deal with the possibility in different ways. Some have families and friends and roots. Travel is […]

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Have Ph.D. … Will Travel—Part 1

As May approaches, Ph.D. candidates are scrambling to submit dissertation chapters to their committee chairs. At the same time, many have heard or are eagerly waiting to hear from search committees regarding potential jobs. Some even have job offers. During a hectic time, the negotiation process only adds to the hubbub. Here’s some advice: Take […]

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Imagining a More Action-Oriented Tenure Process

On the first day of school, two students started fighting. One student tried to escape. The two ran from the first to third floor. A crowd followed them. Just before the fight stopped, a security guard’s head slammed through a window in my classroom’s door. She never returned to school. A few days later, someone […]

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