Tag Archives: Tenure

Summing Up – I

I’ve been doing this blog for over half a decade.  At some point what was irregular in the writing of it, became regular; rather than write a blog every now and then we put out a blog a day.  Various folks in the Pullias Center helped staff and write for it.  We cooked up special […]

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Requiem for Tenure and Shared Governance at the University of Wisconsin?

Over the past few weeks, I have condemned the treatment of University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones by the Mississippi Board of Trustees, questioned the efficacy of standardized testing and university ranking systems, and even criticized my own university for its handling of graduate students in the Roski School MFA program.  With my advisor (Bill […]

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When Entrepreneurialism “Disrupts” Academic and Artistic Rigor

Imagine, for a moment, the following scenario: A department of economics, with an internationally-respected, highly-selective graduate program that provides full funding for PhD students, receives a $70 million donation from a capital venture fund.  The donation, introduced by prominent figures from the financial investment world (perhaps Robert Kraft or James Dimon), is earmarked for the […]

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On Academic Life: The End of the Circle

It was not long ago (in my mind, anyway) that I entered graduate school, earned my doctorate, and began a career as an academic. I did not have a clue as to where the journey would take me…and I suddenly find myself nearing the end of that journey. In previous posts I tried to point […]

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On Academic Life: For Those Starting Out

This post is aimed at those who want to pursue an academic career. Most likely, that decision will be an intentional and well thought-out move, unlike the more or less random way that I fell in to academia. In any case, at this point, nearing the end of my academic career, there are some things […]

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On Academic Life: Figuring Out Who You Are

Identity is a crucial issue in terms of development. At some point, everyone has to ask themselves, “Who am I?” A simple question, but an exceedingly complex one at the same time. This question is relevant to any career choice, including being an academic – at least it was for me. I think it has […]

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On Academic Life: You Didn’t Really Do It On Your Own

I often wonder how fate has intervened at various times in my career to lead me to where I am today. For example, I often think about the possibility that I might have ended up working in the mines of northern Mexico in the state of Durango, where my father was born sometime around 1917. […]

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On Academic Life: A Time To Look Back

I am currently a professor at USC, where I have worked for a bit over thirty years now. I grew up only a couple of miles from Keck Medical Center, which used to be known to everyone in the surrounding community as LAC/USC Medical Center – or County Hospital. It is only a few miles […]

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Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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