Tag Archives: Teaching

Quality Instruction

When considering quality instruction, I often think about the age-old question “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Does quality instruction emerge through finely crafted standards and top-of the-line curriculum and text materials or does quality instruction come from a quality professor? After pondering this for about 20 years, as a public school teacher […]

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The Elephant in the Hallway: Promises for Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education

I believe that I am a “good teacher.” On most days when I teach I am fully present, minutes never pass slowly, and I am dancing in concert with ideas, actions, and my students. My professional identity is strongly tied to my belief that I am a good teacher, but the evidence I have to […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Where’s Rieber Hall?

Late one night last fall, I ended up driving through the UCLA campus after the LA Metro Transportation Authority, Caltrans, and Kiewit decided to reroute me and other drivers off the 405 freeway for the one-millionth time in the last five years, but I digress. I attended UCLA as an undergrad and then worked as […]

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The Revolution is Now?

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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Training Undergraduates for Disciplinary Writing and Research

Imagine, for a moment, you are a world-class athlete training at a top Division 1 university as a track specialist in the 110-meter hurdles. For several years, you have endeavored to acquire several event-specific abilities that are fundamentally important for success in your event. Speed, of course, is a necessity, so the fast-twitch fibers in […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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