Tag Archives: Teaching

The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Where’s Rieber Hall?

Late one night last fall, I ended up driving through the UCLA campus after the LA Metro Transportation Authority, Caltrans, and Kiewit decided to reroute me and other drivers off the 405 freeway for the one-millionth time in the last five years, but I digress. I attended UCLA as an undergrad and then worked as […]

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The Revolution is Now?

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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Training Undergraduates for Disciplinary Writing and Research

Imagine, for a moment, you are a world-class athlete training at a top Division 1 university as a track specialist in the 110-meter hurdles. For several years, you have endeavored to acquire several event-specific abilities that are fundamentally important for success in your event. Speed, of course, is a necessity, so the fast-twitch fibers in […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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10 Thoughts No Academic Will Have on their Deathbed

I got my PhD in 1984. During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators. I’ve seen different individuals and groups as ‘research subjects’ as students, colleagues, and as friends. I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense. By no means is this everything someone should know […]

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10 Things I Wish All Boards of Trustees Knew

I got my PhD in 1984. During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators. I’ve seen different individuals and groups as ‘research subjects’ as students, colleagues, and as friends. I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense. By no means is this everything […]

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10 Things I Wish All Presidents Knew

I got my PhD in 1984. During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators. I’ve seen different individuals and groups as ‘research subjects’ as students, colleagues, and as friends. I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense. By no means is this everything […]

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