Tag Archives: Teaching

Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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Tom Hanks Loves #FreeCommunityCollege and So Do I

Is it possible for Tom Hanks to be any more lovable? Apparently, yes. Last week, the actor who made such endearing classics as “Big,” “The ‘Burbs,” and “Turner & Hooch” published an editorial about his time at Chabot Community College. After discussing his experiences, he concluded, “That place made me what I am today.” Hanks […]

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Why Mix Education and Digital Media/Gaming?

(Over the next semester, we will be dedicating Thursdays to exploring the role of technology and social media on learning and education. Many Thursday posts and guest bloggers will be related to the First in the World grant recently awarded to the Pullias Center. We encourage your feedback and look forward to the e-journey. Zoe […]

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Why Free College Tuition is a Bad Idea: Water and College

President Obama has come out for what Tennessee has put forward, which is free college tuition at the community college level.  If we skim over the idea, it sounds terrific – go to college for free.  Who can be against that? Let’s recognize nothing is free.  Colleges have to get money from somewhere, so all […]

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Quality Instruction

When considering quality instruction, I often think about the age-old question “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Does quality instruction emerge through finely crafted standards and top-of the-line curriculum and text materials or does quality instruction come from a quality professor? After pondering this for about 20 years, as a public school teacher […]

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The Elephant in the Hallway: Promises for Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education

I believe that I am a “good teacher.” On most days when I teach I am fully present, minutes never pass slowly, and I am dancing in concert with ideas, actions, and my students. My professional identity is strongly tied to my belief that I am a good teacher, but the evidence I have to […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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