Tag Archives: Teaching

The State of Writing Instruction in Higher Education – Do We Really Care?

During the month of June, I had the privilege to teach writing classes for the Pullias Center’s SummerTIME program for the second year.  Although the time required to teach writing (on top of my research and coursework responsibilities) makes the summer a little hectic, I always look forward to the program.  I miss teaching a […]

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Change from the Inside

Some think that the For-Profit Higher Education Industry in the United States is on life support.  In May, Corinthian Colleges, filed for Chapter 11 protection and closed its doors, leaving thousands of students without a college to go to and millions (perhaps billions) of dollars in loans for the government to forgive.  The largest and best […]

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The Veil of Perfection: Academic (In)Vulnerability

In light of the blog I posted last week, I started to think about constructive ways to think about talking about race, racism, and seemingly difficult topics. I want to be clear, I’m not writing this as a pundit on race or Black Studies, because I’m not—I’m writing this simply as a Black man. There […]

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A Tale of the Undocumented (Part 1): A 2000 Mile Journey Across the Border

Nineteen-ninety marked the beginning of a new journey.  My family decided to cross the Rio Grande into the United States. I do not remember much of the journey, since I was only two years old, but my brothers were more aware of the situation at the time. Mexico was facing a recession.  Coming from a […]

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Summing Up III

There is certainly still a lot to write about:  Just recently I saw Happy Valley which is a documentary about the Sandusky Case at Penn State University (tragically illuminating).  I just finished Orlando Patterson’s 700 page text The Cultural Matrix: Understanding Black Youth (an epic tour de force).  This year I’ve been an expert witness […]

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Summing Up II

I noticed a few weeks back that Marquette University, to its considerable credit, has raised its minimum wage for workers to $16.00/hour.  I weighed in on this last year and suggested that USC do something similar.   I also have written about “college for all” and over time have come to see it with mixed emotions.  […]

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Melting in Summer

In the summer after high school graduation, many college-intending students often discover themselves to be without the crucial knowledge, resources and direction necessary to smoothly transition to college.  Though they’ve completed all the high school requirements, been accepted to at least one college, applied for financial aid, and indicated their plans to enroll in postsecondary […]

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Higher Education in Hong Kong

For the last month I have been in residence as a Fellow at the University of Hong Kong.  The Fellowship is a three-year interdisciplinary arrangement where I am in residence.  My obligations are relatively minor: we outlined a plan over a three year time horizon that involves offering a lecture or two every time I […]

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Why a Sabbatical to India that is a Fulbright

The thought of applying for a Fulbright is a fun, but time-consuming, exercise.  Where in the world would you like to go that will advance your research agenda?  One mistake colleagues make when they think about sabbaticals is that they don’t start planning about what they are going to do until a semester before it […]

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Can Academic Publishing Be Disrupted?

The proliferation of academic journals creates a problem for any scholars who want to stay up-to-date on the newest research in their fields.  Years ago, when I taught music history, it was a simple matter to walk over to the library and skim through the 15-20 journals that were central to my scholarly interests.  Today, […]

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