Tag Archives: Teaching

People in Glass Houses: Rick Hess, AERA, and Rankings

Every year around this time Rick Hess writes a little screed in his outlet of choice – Ed Week – where he calls to task those individuals who come up with funny titles for presentations at AERA.  You can read his previous blogs here and here.  I’ve never been partial to ridicule, although its close […]

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Top 11 Things to Think About Approaching AERA’s Annual Meeting

There are two kinds of travelers – people who throw things into their suitcase at the last minute and rush to make the airplane, and others who start to lay out their clothes a few weeks before departure.  The former will have done little to no planning about what to see and do, and the […]

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Book Review: The Teacher Wars – Dana Goldstein (I read this and you should, too.)

As a first-year PhD student at Stanford we all had to take a course whose title I forget but was taught by David Tyack.  It was a superb seminar largely because David had us read primary texts and Tyack was a phenomenal teacher.  In a quiet, conversational, engaging and funny manner David had us read […]

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This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

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On Academic Life: The End of the Circle

It was not long ago (in my mind, anyway) that I entered graduate school, earned my doctorate, and began a career as an academic. I did not have a clue as to where the journey would take me…and I suddenly find myself nearing the end of that journey. In previous posts I tried to point […]

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On Academic Life: For Those Starting Out

This post is aimed at those who want to pursue an academic career. Most likely, that decision will be an intentional and well thought-out move, unlike the more or less random way that I fell in to academia. In any case, at this point, nearing the end of my academic career, there are some things […]

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On Academic Life: Figuring Out Who You Are

Identity is a crucial issue in terms of development. At some point, everyone has to ask themselves, “Who am I?” A simple question, but an exceedingly complex one at the same time. This question is relevant to any career choice, including being an academic – at least it was for me. I think it has […]

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On Academic Life: You Didn’t Really Do It On Your Own

I often wonder how fate has intervened at various times in my career to lead me to where I am today. For example, I often think about the possibility that I might have ended up working in the mines of northern Mexico in the state of Durango, where my father was born sometime around 1917. […]

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Boards of Higher Education–The Elephant in the Room

I wrote my dissertation on governing boards.  While I continue to be interested in the role and influence of boards in higher education, I wonder why others aren’t.  Or at least I wonder why we don’t talk more about boards and want to know more about them.  After all, Terry MacTaggart has said that no […]

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Thoughts on Vocational Education in Japan

A few nights ago, a program on NHK (Japan’s public television station) profiled several young Japanese students in a school-sponsored apprenticeship program.  I immediately became engrossed by the show, as it was another demonstration of the methods through which Japanese industries elevate seemingly mundane tasks into art.  Anyone who has ever seen how soba noodles […]

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