Tag Archives: Teaching

Thoughts on Building an Innovation State

Last week, Janet Napolitano, the current President of the University of California system, gave the annual Pullias Lecture at USC.  The transcript of her speech, entitled “A Trifecta for the Future: Higher Education, California, and Innovation,” can be found here.  Having never seen Napolitano speak in person before, I was immediately struck by her commanding […]

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Not Voting in a Time of Crisis

School Board elections are upon us here in Los Angeles. Elections will be held on March 3rd. There are seven Board seats, each representing a different part of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Four of the seven members are up for reelection. There are three contested seats. I know the incumbents who currently hold […]

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The Role of Laws and Policies in Maintaining the Status Quo

Today I turn my attention to federal and state laws and policies, particularly the ways in which they are implemented that inadvertently (or possibly intentionally) maintain the status quo. I am choosing to talk about law and policy and the implementation of law and policy because they are inextricably intertwined with each other. A law […]

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If I’m Not Teaching You, I Should Be Fired

Yesterday I said that I was going to spend four days talking about “the ways in which we (collectively) work harder to maintain the status quo than we do to change it.  I will discuss how our actions ultimately prevent us from reaching what we say are our goals.” I am going to spend today […]

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My Love for Public Education

I have been drawn to the field of education ever since high school.  When I was in 11th grade, I told my history teacher, Mrs. Nelson, that I wanted to become a history teacher. She told me she did not recommend I pursue this path. She said it was too much work, too hard, and […]

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The Experience Economy: The Bad

“Professor” Harold Hill decided to fleece the good citizens of River City by making them think that they needed music in their high school “right here in River City.”  “The Music Man” was one of the most popular musicals of the 1950s and highlights how people can be screwed over by con men. The Experience […]

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On the Purpose of Education – Part 2

In my last post, I asked if the primary purpose of education is to find a job.  Since then, at least two developments have engendered a considerable amount of discussion around that very topic.  On January 26, an article entitled “The Day the Purpose of College Changed” by Dan Barrett from the Chronicle of Higher […]

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Research Focusing of Promoting Equity

With the reversal, starting in the late 1970s, of this nation’s century-long trajectory toward economic and educational fairness, we need to rethink how to promote fairness and social justice. Given the pervasive use of market mechanisms in higher education and urban schools, this is especially urgent. In particular, the notion that there are pipelines to […]

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Rethinking the Foundations of Higher Education

Rethinking the Foundations of Higher Education

The Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) has played a substantial role in developing content in the field through the publication of ASHE readers. These texts essentially reproduce noteworthy articles, papers, and chapters as textbooks that can be used in core courses. Advancing Higher Education as a Field of Study (edited by Sydney […]

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Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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