Tag Archives: Students

Recognizing the Trajectory Toward Inequality

In his term as president of the American Education Research Association, Bill Tierney focused on inequity in education. Recently, he edited a volume with Johns Hopkins University Press, Rethinking Education and Poverty, that will help raise the awareness of researchers that focus on inequality in K-12 and higher education. After reviewing the draft chapters, I […]

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Tom Hanks Loves #FreeCommunityCollege and So Do I

Is it possible for Tom Hanks to be any more lovable? Apparently, yes. Last week, the actor who made such endearing classics as “Big,” “The ‘Burbs,” and “Turner & Hooch” published an editorial about his time at Chabot Community College. After discussing his experiences, he concluded, “That place made me what I am today.” Hanks […]

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On Bargaining

Over the years lots of individuals have asked me how to negotiate for a new faculty position, a new job, a raise, or a promotion.  There are three basic rules to follow: Don’t be a doormat:  Rarely do I hear of positions where there is zero negotiation.  I know it’s nice to have a job, […]

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Why Free College Tuition is a Bad Idea: Water and College

President Obama has come out for what Tennessee has put forward, which is free college tuition at the community college level.  If we skim over the idea, it sounds terrific – go to college for free.  Who can be against that? Let’s recognize nothing is free.  Colleges have to get money from somewhere, so all […]

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Linked Learning Tuesdays

This semester, I will be blogging on Tuesdays about a relatively new educational initiative entitled Linked Learning. In a nutshell, Linked Learning combines academic instruction with technical curricula to foster real-world skills and facilitate work-based learning. This integration, known as a “pathway,” is intended to be multidisciplinary, with collaboration between English, mathematics, science, social studies, […]

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What’s in a Name?

Professor? Dr.? Bill? Since the first day of my Ph.D. program I consistently called all of my instructors Dr. So and So. This was against the norm of most students; students called the faculty members by their first names both to their face and behind closed doors. Along the way I have received some pushback […]

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

I had the great honor this week to be asked by the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics to participate in their technical review panel to develop an alternate measure of income for for-profit colleges and non-degree certificate programs at community colleges who fail the department’s Gainful Employment Eligibility criterion. I felt like […]

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I Read This Book and You Can If You Want To: “These Kids: Identity, Agency, and Social Justice at a Last Chance High School” by Kysa Nygreen

I approached this 217-page book with a fair amount of hope but finished it disappointed. Any book, especially an academic text, can be a disappointment and yet the text can be a learning experience. If I were to suggest that someone read this book I would probably recommend it for its flaws rather than its […]

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I AM Mentoring Program Update

It’s November again and the college application season is in full swing. We (Carlos Galan, Michelle Cadena, and 50 volunteer mentors) have been helping 175 high school seniors apply to college. For California public universities (the University of California [UC] and the California State University [CSU]), the applications are due on Sunday, November 30. This […]

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I Read This Book and You Have To: It’s Complicated

It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by danah boyd is a fun, thoughtful, essential book to read for anyone who is trying to make sense of how teenagers make use of social media. Her narrative voice is great; from page 1 until the end of the book 213 pages later, the reader has […]

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