Tag Archives: Students

I’m an Educated Mother AND a Mother who Educates

Last year, I helped organize a week’s worth of blogs about how motherhood influences the professional worlds of those aspiring for the Ph.D. or those moving up the academic ranks.  What my colleagues and I  didn’t explicitly focus on is the bidirectionality of wearing the hats of “mom” and “Ph.D.” I have 3 daughters, the […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Invisible User

“I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me… When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me,” Ralph Ellison wrote in his Invisible Man. I am a Black man and in some spaces, because of this identity, I battle the […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Tyranny of Meritocracy

I read this and you don’t need to. I approached this book with a great deal of anticipation.  The idea of “merit” is an important notion in American higher education, and Lani Guinier is one of our country’s most thoughtful legal scholars.  The concise 160 page book is also published by Beacon Press so I […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

What Is Collegial in Higher Education?

The idea of “collegiality,” an important concept for any academic institution, has been on my mind over the past couple of weeks.  Simply put, collegiality is a cooperative relationship between colleagues founded upon respect.  Virtually no one relishes abrasive confrontation, particularly when an individual’s response seems out of proportion to the importance of the issue […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Choose a College on Personal Fit, Not Rankings

While I was working at a shared writing center between the University of Central Florida and Daytona State College, the president of Daytona State surprised the community of 30,000 students and assorted faculty with an impromptu campus-wide celebration.  During a speech in which employee attendance was mandatory, the big news was announced: Daytona State had […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

The University of Mississippi Board of Trustees: A New Confederacy of Dunces

For most of my youth, I lived in Augusta, Georgia.  Due to the resources at the local university (then named Augusta College), I first learned how to use a computer, was able to participate in numerous sports, spent countless hours learning about the world in the library, and gave my first piano recitals.  Those recitals, […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

On Academic Life: For Those Starting Out

This post is aimed at those who want to pursue an academic career. Most likely, that decision will be an intentional and well thought-out move, unlike the more or less random way that I fell in to academia. In any case, at this point, nearing the end of my academic career, there are some things […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

On Academic Life: Figuring Out Who You Are

Identity is a crucial issue in terms of development. At some point, everyone has to ask themselves, “Who am I?” A simple question, but an exceedingly complex one at the same time. This question is relevant to any career choice, including being an academic – at least it was for me. I think it has […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

On Academic Life: A Time To Look Back

I am currently a professor at USC, where I have worked for a bit over thirty years now. I grew up only a couple of miles from Keck Medical Center, which used to be known to everyone in the surrounding community as LAC/USC Medical Center – or County Hospital. It is only a few miles […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →