Tag Archives: Students

On “Useless” Liberal and Fine Arts Degrees

Recently, I was entombed with approximately 100 people in a swelteringly hot Boeing 737 that was languishing on a runway for what seemed like hours. As time slowly and miserably progressed, I could sense the tensions of the passengers running high.  With each new bead of sweat, my patience was certainly wearing thin.  Normally, in […]

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Orlando and the Potential We Will Never Know

Meet Akyra Monet Murray, 18 years old, African American who had graduated from high school a few weeks ago. She was college bound on a full scholarship—truly young, gifted and black.  And she bled to death on the bathroom floor of Pulse night club in Orlando. Her high school website said: Akyra was a superstar […]

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Thinking through the Relationship between Diversity and Innovation

Recently, I had the fantastic opportunity to help out with an online diversity class for the USC Rossier Ed.D. program. Although the students were mostly from the United States, they had life experiences from various parts of the world and were currently working in Singapore.  Hence, their views on diversity were inevitably shaped by the […]

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Notes from an Active Shooter Training

A few months ago, staff at USC Rossier was asked to attend an active shooter training–what should we do if a gunman (or woman) came to campus and started shooting at people.  The instructor of the training said this scenario is not a question of “if” but “when.” With the shooting at UCLA yesterday, the […]

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What Happens After Community College?

In my previous post, I summarized that community colleges are non-selective institutions that serve students with various educational goals. I also cited a few statistics, one of which was about how three out of five students begin their community college journey in developmental education. I also added that this rate is higher in California. Upon […]

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Stop Bashing Methods. Help Create a Better World. #BMJnoQual

1. Last year, the British Medical Journal rejected an article. Such an action does not ordinarily generate attention; editors reject articles every day. The author, however, tweeted the rejection: “Thank you for sending us your paper. We read it with interest but I am sorry to say that qualitative studies are an extremely low priority […]

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The Problem of the Whiteness of Sexual Assault Research

I hosted a roundtable at AERA recently (thank you, Kristan Venegas!) to discuss the state of research about sexual assault on college campuses. Two important things happened. First, the table was full. I was encouraged by the number of doctoral students, male and female, representing a diversity of racial backgrounds and institutions, who are thinking […]

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AERA Follow-up: Shoe Tales

It’s commencement season, so I could totally just write about that, but I promised that I would follow up on what happened at my AERA presentation last month. Here is what happened…..not much. I made the presentation and while people seemed “interested” in our study, they didn’t have much critique. And I really expected some. […]

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Dialoguing on Post-Secondary Access

Growing emphasis on the need for college-educated workers have placed the spotlight on higher education in recent decades. For example, recent reports from the Center on the Education and the Workforce tout the need for increased college-educated workers given the rise in information technology and the need for higher levels of cognitive competencies, all of […]

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Once Upon a Time in America – The Over Education of Russell C. Carfagno

Play this while you read. On March 2, my mother lost her last remaining sibling.   Russell C. “Bunny” Carfagno passed quietly that morning after a short illness – a giant of a man despite his diminutive stature.  He was part of Tom Brokaw’s Greatest Generation.  In fact, he really played a part.  As a musician in the […]

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