Tag Archives: Social Media

Facebook Doesn’t Care About Ethics, So Why Should You?

The internet nearly broke when researchers published a new study, “Experimental Evidence of Massive-scale Emotional Contagion through Social Networks.” Scientists, conducting a psychological experiment including approximately 700,000 Facebook users, manipulated news feeds to examine the effects of positive and negative posts. Researchers found that Facebook posts influence users’ moods; the general public and research community […]

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Postsecondary Play

How often do we approach education playfully? Not this last week. My hometown of Santa Barbara is still reeling from the horrendous shooting rampage that tore through Isla Vista. My heart aches for UCSB students and their families, but also for faculty and staff. I have been moved by Facebook posts from USCB professors reaching […]

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The Academic, Version 2.0: The Scholar in the Era of Social Media (#AERA14)

The Academic, Version 2.0: The Scholar in the Era of Social Media (#AERA14) Sun, April 6, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Convention Center, 100 Level, 108B Scholars have been late adopters of social media compared to professionals in other fields; however, our critical role in connecting with youth and across disciplines makes mastering social media an essential […]

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For-Profit Colleges, Social Media, and MOOCs…. Oh my! Join Me During AERA 2014

With #AERA14 just a few weeks away, I am eagerly preparing with excitement for another undoubtedly eventful conference. While last year I painted the town “for-profit, this year I plan to do the same with a few surprises as well. This AERA I am fortunate to expand on my work regarding for-profit higher education, particularly […]

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Humblebrags, Fangirling, & Throwing Shade: Academic Reputation Building in Social Media

Over the summer, I tried to develop a Twitter and Facebook presence for my current team research project. It went nowhere. I don’t think we’ve put a thing on there since August. There are a few reasons for this. First, we were too busy collecting and analyzing the data to post about it. Second, the […]

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Transformative Power of Social Media?

I’m keeping my comments short today with the hope that you will dedicate the time you might have spent reading the post to clicking around and exploring a couple of links. First, I’m super happy to share this great article about our CollegeologyGames collaborator, Tracy Fullerton, who won a well-deserved award at IndieCade over the […]

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Professors Who Poke

Believe it or not, college and university faculty have embraced online social media. Over ninety percent of faculty use social media in their work; thirty percent use Facebook for academic purposes. Many faculty require students to view social media (40%), many require students to read posts as class assignments (30%), and some require students to […]

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The Geography of Facebook

Self-presentation is the centerpiece of Facebook. By design, on all social media sites, the user is the central node of her social graph; everything in her network refers back to her self-impression online. Social media researchers refer to this as the “egocentric” nature of sites like Facebook. Whether posted by the user or by her […]

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Wars with Friends?

The process of sharing information and experiences online ultimately makes them the common possession of all who are in our networks.  Whether we produce the information or consume it, our viewpoints are modified for better or worse, though perhaps not so categorically.  Messages, photos, Likes, links and tags amend meaning; they do what shared experiences […]

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Bowling with Facebook Friends

For John Dewey, the ultimate challenge of American democracy was to achieve the “Great Community” (1927/1946).  Dewey recognized in the early decades of the 20th century that technology would alter the development of democratic community, but only if realized effectively. If technologies could expand communication and extend the range of associations and relationships among women […]

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