Tag Archives: Research

How New Is Competency-Based Education Anyway?

Back in the mid-1990s, my family moved from Georgia to Florida between my sophomore and junior years of high school. Transferring from one state school system to another can create a number of problems for a teenager.  You enter a new school environment, without a clear knowledge of the best teachers (and the teachers to […]

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Three Less Recognized, but Critically Needed, Skills of Leadership in Higher Education

There are few organizations as complex in terms of mission, structure and stakeholders as a university. And while shared governance is clearly an operational necessity in higher education, administrative leadership is also required to produce optimum outcomes for students, faculty, staff and the broader community of an institution. Among many other duties, leaders in higher […]

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Phyllis Schlafley and I Go Way Back

Phyllis Schlafley and I go way back. She plagued me in the late 1970s when I was a college student. I had been sexually assaulted in the first semester of my freshman year, and was struggling with feelings of shame and rage. I watched her almost single-handedly engineer the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment […]

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On the Job Market, Part Two

I was fortunate to get invited to a campus interview this past fall. It was another marathon in its own way.  Here’s what I learned. The interview days I was flown out the day before my interview. So, when they say that the interview starts the moment you land at the airport that was exactly how […]

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On the Job Market

On the job market… These are stressful words for anyone looking for work. As a current postdoc looking for employment, I write to share what I’ve learned from this past semester of being in the thick of it. Starting Printing out the job call then reading it through with a highlighter and pen helps me. It […]

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My Higher Ed Wish List

The past year was an exciting yet troubling time for higher education. Those of us who are dedicated to making institutions more accessible and equitable places for students have a long road ahead in 2016, but we also saw some signs of progress in 2015. As we engage in the holidays and the beginning of […]

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Still a Grand Vision?

On July 1, 2013, Governor Jerry Brown signed the Local Control and Funding Formula (LCFF) in California ending 40 years of reliance on categorical funding.  Frequently Asked Questions on LCFF can be found HERE, but essentially LCFF intends to enhance educational outcomes for students—particularly high-needs students, such as low-income students, English learners, and foster youth—through […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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Tips for Approaching Ph.D. Coursework

After this week, I will be finished with my doctoral coursework and begin preparations for qualifying exams in the spring.  If I had chosen to pursue a Ph.D. in the United Kingdom or Hong Kong (where I received my Masters degree in higher education), no classes would have been necessary.  Ph.D. students in those locations […]

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Interviewing and the Importance of Listening

Have you ever read a Henry James novel? I have, as an undergraduate in an American lit. class. I, along with 20 or so of my peers, read Portrait of a Lady. James—the brother of psychologist William James—is known for long, descriptive passages and a focus on the minutiae of life and consciousness. You can […]

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