Tag Archives: Reform

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

This past summer’s Facebook and Twitter feeds were dominated by videos of individuals dousing themselves with buckets of ice water and challenging celebrities, friends, family, and colleagues to do the same in the name of charity. What has become known as the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has raised over $100 million in the last month […]

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The End of My Beginning …

Last Monday, I successfully defended my doctoral dissertation almost four years to the day that I started my Ph.D. program. It has been quite a ride. As I entered the room with the nationally known researchers, past university presidents, and research organization heads, I couldn’t help but feel honored to be there sharing about the […]

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Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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The Revolution is Now?

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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Ten Ways to Improve Educational Outcomes for Low-Income Youth

Double the minimum wage Create a full employment economy Give homeless youth a home End hunger Provide universal health care Treat mental illness Reduce incarceration Reduce income inequality Reduce the dropout rate Provide maternity and infant care Is there any that doubt if we did even half of these, educational outcomes would increase? If so, […]

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The Ivory Tower—An Investment or a Gamble

While planning to review Ivory Tower, Andrew Rossi’s inventive documentary about higher education, I felt fortunate to have an arts house landmark theatre in St Louis. But I had a friend visiting for the weekend, so I sat alone at the noon showing at the Tivoli theatre in the University City Loop. It was an […]

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A Research Agenda for For-Profit Colleges and Universities

At first glance, the topic of a research agenda for for-profit institutions may seem to be a rather narrow, technical issue, of concern largely to those closely affiliated with those institutions—at most, some of those who work in them, who regulate them, who study them, and maybe even some of those who take courses in […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences IV: Final Considerations

This is the fourth installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here. Last year, the California State Legislature considered outsourcing courses to external providers. The Democratic-controlled legislature was troubled that students could not get the classes they needed. The […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences III: “Lead Generation” and Slippery Slopes in Higher Education

This is the third installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here and Part II is here. Until September 2013, the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) prohibited the use of commissioned agents in international student recruitment. There are numerous purist reasons to disdain what has come […]

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Ivory Tower Sounds the Alarm and is A Call to Action To Address the Student Loan Crisis

I went to see the documentary Ivory Tower last Friday. The movie was well done and very informative about the state of higher education and more specifically the student loan crisis in the United States. Although I didn’t hear all that much that I hadn’t known already, the barrage of bad news during the documentary […]

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