Tag Archives: Reform

Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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When Entrepreneurialism “Disrupts” Academic and Artistic Rigor

Imagine, for a moment, the following scenario: A department of economics, with an internationally-respected, highly-selective graduate program that provides full funding for PhD students, receives a $70 million donation from a capital venture fund.  The donation, introduced by prominent figures from the financial investment world (perhaps Robert Kraft or James Dimon), is earmarked for the […]

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What’s in a Title: Non-Profit or For-Profit Colleges

If you’re going to make money as a for-profit college, fair enough.  I understand the strengths and weaknesses of for-profits probably as well as anyone.  I’ve supported them when they are doing what they are supposed to do, and I’ve criticized them when they fall short. My friend and colleague, Bob Shireman, with whom I […]

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Creativity: The Key to Future Employment?

This week, while canvassing for research that might help my end-of-semester papers, I came across a recently published report filled with interesting accounts about the difficulties Millennials in California are facing on the job market.  Seemingly every month, similar reports lament the perceived inadequacies of the U.S. workforce.  Many narratives promote a greater investment in […]

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The Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges

(Written with James Dean Ward) The small private liberal arts college may soon be an endangered species. About one-third of the nation’s approximately 4,500 private nonprofit and for-profit institutions have student bodies of 1,500 students or less. Of these, roughly half, or 750, are experiencing financial pressures because of bond indebtedness, according to a recently […]

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Everything Old is New Again

Enjoy this video, by clicking HERE. It may be the last smile for this blog. I promised in my March piece that I would continue my theme of Non-Price competition and why non-selective colleges were ill prepared to consider this pricing strategy.  However, this week’s actions so rocked the education environment that I am compelled to […]

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What Is Collegial in Higher Education?

The idea of “collegiality,” an important concept for any academic institution, has been on my mind over the past couple of weeks.  Simply put, collegiality is a cooperative relationship between colleagues founded upon respect.  Virtually no one relishes abrasive confrontation, particularly when an individual’s response seems out of proportion to the importance of the issue […]

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What’s Going On?

So this blog has nothing to do with formal education, but it has everything to do about informal education and survival. I have two little kids. They play with other kids. They have conflicts, because well, they are kids, and this is a time when they are supposed to be working this stuff out. Tonight, […]

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This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

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Boards of Higher Education–The Elephant in the Room

I wrote my dissertation on governing boards.  While I continue to be interested in the role and influence of boards in higher education, I wonder why others aren’t.  Or at least I wonder why we don’t talk more about boards and want to know more about them.  After all, Terry MacTaggart has said that no […]

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