Tag Archives: Public Good

Tested: An Interview with Filmmaker Curtis Chin

Filmmaker Curtis Chin gained notoriety for his documentary “Vincent Who?” about Vincent Chin (no relation), an Asian American killed by Detroit autoworkers who blamed him for the loss of their jobs. They conflated this Chinese American with the rise of the Japanese auto industry.  It was a turning point in the lives of Asian Americans.  As Frank Wu wrote in […]

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Critical Issues in Higher Education

This summer I’m creating a syllabus for a course that hasn’t been taught at my institution before but has been named “Critical This summer I’m creating a syllabus for a course that hasn’t been taught at my institution before but has been named “Critical Issues in Higher Education.” Over the course of one quarter, for […]

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On “Useless” Liberal and Fine Arts Degrees

Recently, I was entombed with approximately 100 people in a swelteringly hot Boeing 737 that was languishing on a runway for what seemed like hours. As time slowly and miserably progressed, I could sense the tensions of the passengers running high.  With each new bead of sweat, my patience was certainly wearing thin.  Normally, in […]

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Orlando and the Potential We Will Never Know

Meet Akyra Monet Murray, 18 years old, African American who had graduated from high school a few weeks ago. She was college bound on a full scholarship—truly young, gifted and black.  And she bled to death on the bathroom floor of Pulse night club in Orlando. Her high school website said: Akyra was a superstar […]

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Do Teachers Ever Really Get Time Off?

“Summer afternoon—summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.” This is one of my all-time favorite quotes by American writer, Henry James. I often think of these words on the Summer Solstice, also known as Midsummer, which is the longest day of the year in the […]

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Thinking through the Relationship between Diversity and Innovation

Recently, I had the fantastic opportunity to help out with an online diversity class for the USC Rossier Ed.D. program. Although the students were mostly from the United States, they had life experiences from various parts of the world and were currently working in Singapore.  Hence, their views on diversity were inevitably shaped by the […]

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Graduation Season – Can There be the Predicted Unbundling when there Really is no Integration?

It is graduation season again.  Around the country, families are celebrating their young men and women who parade in colors of the ancient regalia signifying academic achievement.  This regalia and the degrees and diplomas which accompany them signal to the community at large certain qualities and skills obtained by the recent graduate.  There has been many arguments […]

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Notes from an Active Shooter Training

A few months ago, staff at USC Rossier was asked to attend an active shooter training–what should we do if a gunman (or woman) came to campus and started shooting at people.  The instructor of the training said this scenario is not a question of “if” but “when.” With the shooting at UCLA yesterday, the […]

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Getting on (Tenure) Track

Effective June 30th, I’ll be a Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Higher Education at UC Riverside.  As I prepare for this reality, I’ve started receiving and sorting through a lot of advice.  Here I share 5 points that I plan to adhere to in no particular order. 1. To write is right The most popular […]

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The Problem of the Whiteness of Sexual Assault Research

I hosted a roundtable at AERA recently (thank you, Kristan Venegas!) to discuss the state of research about sexual assault on college campuses. Two important things happened. First, the table was full. I was encouraged by the number of doctoral students, male and female, representing a diversity of racial backgrounds and institutions, who are thinking […]

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