Tag Archives: Public Good

Paying for College

Over the last several years we have rightfully been obsessing about student debt. Many students are taking on too much debt. The cost of college can also be a turnoff for poor students who understand debt but don’t necessarily understand foregone earnings. Why go to school for four years, incur debt, and end up with […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

California DREAM Loan Program

A few weeks back, California Governor Jerry Brown signed California Senate Bill 1210 (SB 1210) into law. SB 1210 establishes the California DREAM Loan Program for undocumented immigrant students attending the California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC). In short, undocumented immigrant students who qualify for reduced in-state academic fees (AB 540), […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Strawberry Fields Forever—But What About IP?

We go to the farmer’s market off of Sunset on Sunday mornings. The fruits and vegetables are great and it’s fun wandering around figuring out what to buy. When strawberries are in season I always buy too many since they are so luscious. I buy the ones up the coast toward Watsonville. I think they’re […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Where Will I Send My High Achieving Latina Daughter to College?

First it’s important to note, this is not a humble brag blog entry, this is a post written out of serious worry about future educational opportunities, and not just for my kid of color. In California, if you are born after September 2, you have to attend “Transitional Kindergarten (TK)” and then begin regular Kindergarten […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

A Research Agenda for For-Profit Colleges and Universities

At first glance, the topic of a research agenda for for-profit institutions may seem to be a rather narrow, technical issue, of concern largely to those closely affiliated with those institutions—at most, some of those who work in them, who regulate them, who study them, and maybe even some of those who take courses in […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Obama’s Executive Action on Student Loans: Turn Down For What

So, President Obama announced an executive action to allow for decreased payments for student loan borrowers after 2007. Basically, borrowers in that category will only have to pay 10% of their income in loans for 20 years and their remaining debt is forgiven. I think it’s pretty exciting that past and future borrowers will have […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

I Read This and You Don’t Need To: How Universities Work

John Lombardi has a long and distinguished career as a successful, argumentative university president at the University of Massachusetts, University of Florida, and Louisiana State. He has penned a short, incisive book, How Universities Work, that ultimately fails because he hasn’t answered the question every author must ask: Who will read this book? The small […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

California No Longer a White Majority: What I Hope This Means For Education Research

According to the California Department of Finance, as of this month the Latino population will match the number of white non-Hispanics for the first time in California history. The department also projects that Latinos will become a majority in 2014, overtaking the white non-Hispanic population. And while population data is often utilized in education research, I would be […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Just What is College? Descriptions from Old Media

Recent days have been laden with all kinds of news items that challenge our notion of what college is. Take the news from the California legislature’s introduction of a bill that would require state-sponsored colleges and universities to accept credits from MOOCs and other alternative low-priced avenues of education. Burke Smith, the founder of Straighterline.com […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →