Tag Archives: Professors

The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Strawberry Fields Forever—But What About IP?

We go to the farmer’s market off of Sunset on Sunday mornings. The fruits and vegetables are great and it’s fun wandering around figuring out what to buy. When strawberries are in season I always buy too many since they are so luscious. I buy the ones up the coast toward Watsonville. I think they’re […]

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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Moving to Full Professor III

We all love lists. We also like transparency. “I don’t know what to do” certainly sounds like a downer. Advice (if it’s correct!) also can be very helpful. But honestly, the last two blogs (located here and here) were a downer for me. I never thought of academic life as a checklist. I never went […]

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Moving to Full Professor II

What’s missing from the list I presented? Editing. I wrote about editing in a previous blog. Editing is something I have enjoyed but does not earn very many direct plaudits. There are also tiers of editing. Editing a university press book is more important than editing something from a third-tier press. Training grants and such. […]

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Moving to Full Professor I

People have asked me what it takes to move from associate to full professor. One of the problems in giving advice is that once something is written down it becomes a “rule.” Caveat emptor! These are not rules. They are opinions and thoughts that have gone, and continue to go, through reformulation. I want to […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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I Read This and You Don’t Need To: How Universities Work

John Lombardi has a long and distinguished career as a successful, argumentative university president at the University of Massachusetts, University of Florida, and Louisiana State. He has penned a short, incisive book, How Universities Work, that ultimately fails because he hasn’t answered the question every author must ask: Who will read this book? The small […]

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On College Football

When I go to school I arrive early, around 6:30. On November 2, 2010 I came out of the parking lot and walked across the street to see yellow police tape around Birnkrant, a student residence. Everything was quiet, but there was an ambulance and police car there and I thought, “This can’t be good.” […]

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