Tag Archives: Professors

Obama’s Student Aid Bill of Rights: More than a Plea for Customer Service?

I guess I could be more excited about Obama’s Bill of Rights for student loan borrowers, but I’m not really sure why I should be. It kind of bugs me that these basic service expectations have to be pulled together as a “bill of rights” at all. Isn’t this just good customer service? There are […]

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Effective Bystander Interventions

Fads are a pain in the neck. They kill a good idea. My beef with fads is that people latch on to pieces of a good idea –the quick fix–but not the whole of it, which is rarely quick. And the result is often a failure. That’s what I see happening with most bystander interventions […]

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The Experience Economy: On Leadership

Amy Gutmann, President of Penn, accumulated all sorts of flack when she followed her students by  falling to the floor at a die-in at her Christmas party this past December. The students were demonstrating in support of those who have been murdered by police in the last several years, and Gutmann supported their protest.  I […]

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Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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What’s in a Name?

Professor? Dr.? Bill? Since the first day of my Ph.D. program I consistently called all of my instructors Dr. So and So. This was against the norm of most students; students called the faculty members by their first names both to their face and behind closed doors. Along the way I have received some pushback […]

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Quality Grading

When grading, it can be tempting to give a check mark or a letter grade and call it a day; but grading student papers can be a conversation between master and apprentice. The body of research on effective feedback indicates that feedback should be timely, specific, and detailed; the research also shows that the majority […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Strawberry Fields Forever—But What About IP?

We go to the farmer’s market off of Sunset on Sunday mornings. The fruits and vegetables are great and it’s fun wandering around figuring out what to buy. When strawberries are in season I always buy too many since they are so luscious. I buy the ones up the coast toward Watsonville. I think they’re […]

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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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