Tag Archives: Professors

Change from the Inside

Some think that the For-Profit Higher Education Industry in the United States is on life support.  In May, Corinthian Colleges, filed for Chapter 11 protection and closed its doors, leaving thousands of students without a college to go to and millions (perhaps billions) of dollars in loans for the government to forgive.  The largest and best […]

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Summing Up III

There is certainly still a lot to write about:  Just recently I saw Happy Valley which is a documentary about the Sandusky Case at Penn State University (tragically illuminating).  I just finished Orlando Patterson’s 700 page text The Cultural Matrix: Understanding Black Youth (an epic tour de force).  This year I’ve been an expert witness […]

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Summing Up II

I noticed a few weeks back that Marquette University, to its considerable credit, has raised its minimum wage for workers to $16.00/hour.  I weighed in on this last year and suggested that USC do something similar.   I also have written about “college for all” and over time have come to see it with mixed emotions.  […]

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Race, Terror, and Tenure – On Collective Outrage

There’s been a lot of talk, criticism, and collective outrage about the decision to weaken tenure and shared governance at University of Wisconsin at Madison. The anger is well founded. Scholars from institutions across the nation and across disciplines expressed their opinions and often harsh criticism of the decision. The widespread response is not a […]

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Summing Up – I

I’ve been doing this blog for over half a decade.  At some point what was irregular in the writing of it, became regular; rather than write a blog every now and then we put out a blog a day.  Various folks in the Pullias Center helped staff and write for it.  We cooked up special […]

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Higher Education in Hong Kong

For the last month I have been in residence as a Fellow at the University of Hong Kong.  The Fellowship is a three-year interdisciplinary arrangement where I am in residence.  My obligations are relatively minor: we outlined a plan over a three year time horizon that involves offering a lecture or two every time I […]

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Why a Sabbatical to India that is a Fulbright

The thought of applying for a Fulbright is a fun, but time-consuming, exercise.  Where in the world would you like to go that will advance your research agenda?  One mistake colleagues make when they think about sabbaticals is that they don’t start planning about what they are going to do until a semester before it […]

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The Utility of a Sabbatical

I didn’t know it at the time, but I’m sorry to say that I think I came of age during academe’s Golden Age in the United States. I may have entered it at the tail end of the Golden Era, but I was still part of it.   My college years, certainly full of angst and […]

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Everything Old is New Again

Starting July 1, I am taking on a “new” administrative role in Rossier. After an exploratory year as the Dean’s Special Projects Assistant, I decided to apply for a “new” position as the Faculty Program Lead for the Master’s Programs. And I got it. And I am grateful. I keep using the term “new” in […]

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Requiem for Tenure and Shared Governance at the University of Wisconsin?

Over the past few weeks, I have condemned the treatment of University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones by the Mississippi Board of Trustees, questioned the efficacy of standardized testing and university ranking systems, and even criticized my own university for its handling of graduate students in the Roski School MFA program.  With my advisor (Bill […]

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