Tag Archives: Professors

The Digital Bookshelf of an Assistant Professor

Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus is one of my favorite plays. At the beginning of the story, Faustus, surrounded by countless dusty tomes, declares that he has read everything about everything. I’m not sure what it says about me (especially given Faustus’ fate), but I frequently think about that scene. I read a lot. I eagerly […]

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Have Ph.D. … Will Travel—Part II

Because newly-minted Ph.D. graduates far outweigh the number of tenure-track positions [read about the sobering statistics here], many will have to travel if they want a job in academia. From my own experiences with friends and colleagues, graduate students deal with the possibility in different ways. Some have families and friends and roots. Travel is […]

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The Poverty of Capitalism

In capitalist societies such as ours, there are hidden contextual rules in our understanding of poverty and its relationship to education. They hide the fact that the struggle for better schools and the elimination of poverty must include the struggle for a democratic socialist alternative to capitalism. This is likely to sound provocative to the […]

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Thursday is TechDay: IGNITE to the Rescue!

Today’s post is a shameless plug for AERA’s IGNITE session. First, let’s get the facts. IGNITE is not a new software platform or digital technology thingamajig. It’s a format for good ol’ fashioned PowerPoint. Nothing fancy, just some new rules. The parameters are simple: (a) presenters are limited to 20 slides, and (b) the time allotted to […]

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Who’s on First?

There is a classic Abbott and Costello skit called “Who’s on first?” where Costello gets befuddled by the names of his friend’s team. We are close to getting into that situation without half as much humor in academe in terms of academic offerings. Not so long ago if someone wanted a bachelor’s degree we would […]

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The Art of Fielding III—The Academic Life

Guert Affenlight is Westish’s President. He is not unlike many good men and women who go about their academic lives trying to do as good as they can possibly can. He is a good, but not a great, president. His tenure has been successful, and he had been a quite successful professor, but many of […]

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The Art of Fielding II—On Excellence

One of the centerpieces of The Art of Fielding is Henry’s ability to field every ball that is hit to him. He is so good that by his junior year he has never made an error; he is about to break the record when he lobs an easy throw over the head of the first […]

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The Art of Fielding I—Overview

The Art of Fielding is an academic novel where baseball is the centerpiece and two of the main characters are in a gay relationship. Did Chad Harbach have me in mind when he wrote this novel? Nevertheless, regardless of whether a reader likes academic novels, gay characters, or baseball, this book is terrific. I have […]

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Education and Poverty: What (Do) We Stand For?

The annoyingly catchy tune by Grammy winner Fun—“Some Nights” —is one you can’t get out of your head. It asks over and over, “What do I stand for?” As we approach a conference with the theme of education and poverty, it is useful to ask this question of ourselves, as individuals and as members of […]

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Looking Back, While Moving Forward

The truth is, the spaces and occupations we belong to can hurt us. Such a notion is no stranger to any profession, much less to anyone working in academe. Yet I wonder why pain and healing seem to be almost taboo topics in this arena. Perhaps because the nature of our work is almost machine-like, […]

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