Tag Archives: Professors

Three Less Recognized, but Critically Needed, Skills of Leadership in Higher Education

There are few organizations as complex in terms of mission, structure and stakeholders as a university. And while shared governance is clearly an operational necessity in higher education, administrative leadership is also required to produce optimum outcomes for students, faculty, staff and the broader community of an institution. Among many other duties, leaders in higher […]

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Why International Travel Changed My Life

This past winter break afforded me time to reflect on why I decided to be a higher education researcher, rather than continue my previous career in music. Immediately after completing a Masters degree in music, I “lucked” into a full-time, visiting professorship at a regional university in rural North Carolina.  The job was extremely gratifying […]

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My Higher Ed Wish List

The past year was an exciting yet troubling time for higher education. Those of us who are dedicated to making institutions more accessible and equitable places for students have a long road ahead in 2016, but we also saw some signs of progress in 2015. As we engage in the holidays and the beginning of […]

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Selective Silence

About two weeks ago, I shut down my Facebook to the bare minimum. I use Facebook as a means to communicate with friends and family, but also with the academic community that I am a part of. Between the terrorist attacks globally, the ongoing murders of men of color in the US, and the ongoing […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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Why I Study Access to Higher Education

When I was a senior in high school, I felt lost. I knew I wanted to go to college to do better and make money—I uncritically believed in the bootstrapping narrative of social mobility, long before I opened a book by Bourdieu, Marx, or Freire. I would go to my neighborhood library and read books […]

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Dr. Brevity: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace the Conference Presentation

During the first week of November, I gave three presentations at the annual Association for the Study of Higher Education conference in Denver, Colorado.  For several years, I have given presentations at a variety of academic conferences, ranging in scope from musicology to American studies to education.  Each disciplinary society has its own peculiar set […]

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India Part One – The Beginning: Indian Higher Education’s Half-Full Glass

I had the opportunity recently to review the applications of Indian academics who have applied for Fulbrights to the United States. It was one of those fun, time-consuming experiences that academics complain about because of the time commitment but actually enjoy a great deal because we get to learn a lot.  A few hundred applications […]

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India, Part One – The Beginning: Higher Education and Cricket

A generation or so ago, it was relatively easy to understand a country’s system of higher education. Most countries had a publicly funded national system of higher education.  A microscopic number of private non-profit institutions existed and there were an even smaller number of for-profit institutions.  One of the few places where there were significant […]

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A Legitimate Form of Academic Engagement

Kathleen Fitzpatrick ends her introductory chapter in Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of Academia with the ominous critique about the possible future of scholarly research: “And we will be silenced, unless we can create new ways of speaking both with that culture and among ourselves.” Her Planned Obsolescence serves as a rallying cry to academics and […]

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