Tag Archives: Professors

Do We Really Need More STEM Graduates?

A common assumption is that there is a desperate need for more students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).  Almost everyone believes it – which is why schools of engineering, for example, are experiencing a boom, and history departments are a bust.  Administrators, faculty, students, parents, and policymakers all argue that we’re throwing good […]

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I Don’t Give Shots…

I’ve found that a lot of folks don’t really understand what someone with a Ph.D. in education does.  They grasp that I teach, but not what I teach.  They somewhat get that I do research, but the fact that the research doesn’t take place in a lab is perplexing.  They are confused by the perpetual […]

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Social Media: Academic Freedom for Whom?

One of my professors recommended that I meet with one of her undergraduate students because we shared similar research interests. I met her at a coffee shop on campus.  It seems natural– the second year PhD student sharing experiences with an undergraduate student planning to apply to a doctoral program. We indeed discussed our similar […]

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When Entrepreneurialism “Disrupts” Academic and Artistic Rigor

Imagine, for a moment, the following scenario: A department of economics, with an internationally-respected, highly-selective graduate program that provides full funding for PhD students, receives a $70 million donation from a capital venture fund.  The donation, introduced by prominent figures from the financial investment world (perhaps Robert Kraft or James Dimon), is earmarked for the […]

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What’s in a Title: Non-Profit or For-Profit Colleges

If you’re going to make money as a for-profit college, fair enough.  I understand the strengths and weaknesses of for-profits probably as well as anyone.  I’ve supported them when they are doing what they are supposed to do, and I’ve criticized them when they fall short. My friend and colleague, Bob Shireman, with whom I […]

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Everything Old is New Again

Enjoy this video, by clicking HERE. It may be the last smile for this blog. I promised in my March piece that I would continue my theme of Non-Price competition and why non-selective colleges were ill prepared to consider this pricing strategy.  However, this week’s actions so rocked the education environment that I am compelled to […]

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Invisible User

“I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me… When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me,” Ralph Ellison wrote in his Invisible Man. I am a Black man and in some spaces, because of this identity, I battle the […]

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What Is Collegial in Higher Education?

The idea of “collegiality,” an important concept for any academic institution, has been on my mind over the past couple of weeks.  Simply put, collegiality is a cooperative relationship between colleagues founded upon respect.  Virtually no one relishes abrasive confrontation, particularly when an individual’s response seems out of proportion to the importance of the issue […]

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People in Glass Houses: Rick Hess, AERA, and Rankings

Every year around this time Rick Hess writes a little screed in his outlet of choice – Ed Week – where he calls to task those individuals who come up with funny titles for presentations at AERA.  You can read his previous blogs here and here.  I’ve never been partial to ridicule, although its close […]

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This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

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