Tag Archives: Privatization

Outsourcing and Its Consequences IV: Final Considerations

This is the fourth installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here. Last year, the California State Legislature considered outsourcing courses to external providers. The Democratic-controlled legislature was troubled that students could not get the classes they needed. The […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences III: “Lead Generation” and Slippery Slopes in Higher Education

This is the third installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here and Part II is here. Until September 2013, the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) prohibited the use of commissioned agents in international student recruitment. There are numerous purist reasons to disdain what has come […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences II: The Philosophical and Ethical Issues Raised by Outsourcing

Apart from the economic premises I raised earlier, outsourcing is also a philosophical principle about how an organization should run its affairs. Once an institution agrees that outsourcing is a credible way to manage resources, it ends up on that proverbial “slippery slope.” I am not suggesting that outsourcing is inherently wrong or ought never […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences I: The Economic Justifications for Outsourcing

I’d like to spend the next few days thinking about outsourcing. What do we gain and lose when we outsource jobs at a university? On one level, outsourcing makes sense. Private and public colleges and universities are non-profit entities facing hard financial times. The goal of cutting costs, while maintaining the viability of the “product” […]

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Newly Released Study: “A Comparison of For-Profit and Community Colleges’ Admissions Practices”

The question of why students are attending for-profit colleges and universities in such record numbers has occupied the majority of my research agenda. I have been especially concerned with the high numbers of students of color and low-income students that make up a considerable percentage of proprietary college enrollments. As I discussed my research trajectory […]

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Avalanches, Tsunamis, Earthquakes, and Other Disasters About to Happen

How the higher ed world changes in such a short time. K–12 education has been in “crisis” much of my adult life, but usually higher education has been spared the Hollywood-like metaphors. “A nation at risk” paralleled other 20th century reports that forecast calamity because particular goals had not been reached in K–12 education. The […]

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Who’s on First?

There is a classic Abbott and Costello skit called “Who’s on first?” where Costello gets befuddled by the names of his friend’s team. We are close to getting into that situation without half as much humor in academe in terms of academic offerings. Not so long ago if someone wanted a bachelor’s degree we would […]

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AERA 2013: Painting the Town “For-Profit”

For-profit colleges and universities, whether we find them to be friend or foe, are now deeply woven into the fabric of U.S. higher education and society overall. As the 2013 American Educational Research Association Conference in San Francisco draws near, I am particularly excited about sessions that explore for-profit higher education and the changing nature […]

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For-Profit Colleges, Costs, and the Presidential Candidates

Any presidential election is an important time to understand the discourse surrounding postsecondary education. Of particular interest to me during this election is how the candidates are framing the issues of college cost and financial aid as well as the role of for-profit colleges. In both cases, what the candidates propose and even what they […]

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The Price of College Affordability

The political standoff in Washington over extending low interest rates on student loans would have been unimaginable a generation ago. Back then, there was an unwritten compact between government and higher education. Everyone largely assumed that if government—that is, taxpayers—financially helped more people attend and graduate from college, we would all be better off in […]

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