Tag Archives: Poverty

Movie Review: “A Place at the Table” – I watched it – and you should too

Let’s begin with 3 propositions which lead to a fourth: No child in America should go to bed hungry. No child in America should die of cancer. No child in America should die because of terrorism. If we can agree with these propositions, then here’s the fourth: If you disagree with these propositions then you […]

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New Media Literacies and Poverty

Several weeks ago I had the honor of hosting a presidential session at AERA. Henry Jenkins, James Paul Gee, and S. Craig Watkins joined me to discuss how the conference theme—education and poverty— intersected with new media literacies. The session was designed around the premise that social media, the Internet, and online games have the […]

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Thursday is TechDay: IGNITE Update

Today’s post offers follow-up commentary on the IGNITE format I introduced in a previous post. To quote myself: IGNITE is… a [new] format for good ol’ fashioned PowerPoint. Nothing fancy, just some new rules. The parameters are simple: (a) presenters are limited to 20 slides, and (b) the time allotted to each slide is 15 seconds, no […]

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AERA Poverty Videos

These are the two videos (click here and here) that preceded the AERA lecture. Many of you have asked for them. Leo Diaz made them. I’ll be thinking and writing about this past year after I catch my breath. Adieu.

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What’s Race Got to Do with It?

As faculty members and co-directors of the Center for Urban Education (CUE) at the University of Southern California, we lead action research using CUE’s Equity Scorecard. The mission of our center is to create the “tools” needed for colleges and universities to bring about racial/ethnic equity in students’ collegiate experiences and outcomes. In the action […]

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Poverty and Impoverishment in the Bay Area of California

AERA’s 2013 theme is centered on the issue of “poverty.” It is spurred by President Bill Tierney’s provocation that despite education’s ability to lift students out of poverty, schooling is often mired in economic relations surrounded by the debilitating effects of poverty. There are at least two senses of “poverty” invoked here, to which I […]

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Education Policy is Social Policy

Great relief swept over me when I saw the theme for this year’s AERA—finally, we are led by a team of scholars who recognize the intimate connections between our educational institutions and broader societal structures, and encourage us to talk about those connections without fear that we are downplaying the urgency that schooling requires. I […]

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Poverty and Education: Reflections on the AERA Conference Theme

I confess some ambivalence about a definition of poverty which encompasses the moral, intellectual, and material domains. Not because each of these domains is unimportant; rather, my concern is that defining poverty this broadly runs the risk of obscuring the ways in which they are intertwined. Impoverished material circumstances may heighten the risk of an impoverished moral or […]

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A Global “HEADS UP” About Poverty and Education

Addressing questions of justice and inequality in educational research requires a deep understanding of the social, economic, and historical forces that connect us to one another and of the difficulties of intervening in complex and dynamic systems. For example, if people saw children drowning in the rapids of a river, their first impulse would probably […]

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Reading History and Learning About Policy and People

Bill’s assignment was like coming face to face with a task that I had been putting off. Constantly having to put up with political and social rhetoric that wants to take the US back to the days of rugged individualism and “I got mine, you get yours” that has been a central component of this […]

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