Tag Archives: Mark DeFusco

Change from the Inside

Some think that the For-Profit Higher Education Industry in the United States is on life support.  In May, Corinthian Colleges, filed for Chapter 11 protection and closed its doors, leaving thousands of students without a college to go to and millions (perhaps billions) of dollars in loans for the government to forgive.  The largest and best […]

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Why is this Girl Crying? Non-Price Competition, Part Deux

Back in March, I promised to elaborate on the notion that small generic colleges are often the worst prepared to consider non commodity features to focus upon.   That promise came after a simple review of how commodities generally work and how for the vast majority of non-selective universities, the demographics of the market just doesn’t […]

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Everything Old is New Again

Enjoy this video, by clicking HERE. It may be the last smile for this blog. I promised in my March piece that I would continue my theme of Non-Price competition and why non-selective colleges were ill prepared to consider this pricing strategy.  However, this week’s actions so rocked the education environment that I am compelled to […]

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This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

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Pricing: Commodity vs. Non-Price Competition

The basic law of economics is that pricing is determined by the supply and demand of a product or service.    This is bad news for the 7000 post-secondary institutions recognized by Department of Education who accept Title IV funding (there are a couple dozen additional universities who refuse to accept federal funds as a matter […]

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

I had the great honor this week to be asked by the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics to participate in their technical review panel to develop an alternate measure of income for for-profit colleges and non-degree certificate programs at community colleges who fail the department’s Gainful Employment Eligibility criterion. I felt like […]

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Making a Living or Making a Life

For the last several months, I have been serving as the interim CEO for the National Institute of Training and Employment (NITE). It is a very interesting company that is owned by leaders in the higher education private equity sector, Hamilton White and Linden Education. This is a company that focuses on jobs and gets […]

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Rites of Fall—A Reflection on Erich Fromm

Modern man has transformed himself into a commodity; he experiences his life energy as an investment with which he should make the highest profit, considering his position and the situation on the personality market. He is alienated from himself, from his fellow men and from nature. His main aim is profitable exchange of his skills, […]

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In Honor of William B. Michael—Can We Deconstruct a College Education Statistically?

It doesn’t seem right that another September is upon us and Bill Michael (William B. Michael) is not ambling slowly through Waite Phillips Hall, ready to at once terrorize and fascinate wary graduate students required to learn something about research methods and statistics. A giant in the field, Bill would constantly regale his nervous students […]

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The Ivory Tower—An Investment or a Gamble

While planning to review Ivory Tower, Andrew Rossi’s inventive documentary about higher education, I felt fortunate to have an arts house landmark theatre in St Louis. But I had a friend visiting for the weekend, so I sat alone at the noon showing at the Tivoli theatre in the University City Loop. It was an […]

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