Tag Archives: K-12

Let’s Talk About Access

I want to talk about two things, skills and structures.  Let’s start with some numbers about social media and computer science. According to the most recent Pew Research Report, 83% of African American teens play video games, which is more than any other group. Forty five percent of Black teens reported using twitter. Sixty-four percent […]

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Choose a College on Personal Fit, Not Rankings

While I was working at a shared writing center between the University of Central Florida and Daytona State College, the president of Daytona State surprised the community of 30,000 students and assorted faculty with an impromptu campus-wide celebration.  During a speech in which employee attendance was mandatory, the big news was announced: Daytona State had […]

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Rethinking How to Bridge the Digital Divide

You take a kid from the inner city, and bring her into an after-school program where she is given the lastest iPad, an Arduino Mega 2560 (with shields).  She also has unencumbered access to a laser cutter. You show her how to make three dimensional objects on the laser cutter, teach her how to program […]

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Book Review: The Teacher Wars – Dana Goldstein (I read this and you should, too.)

As a first-year PhD student at Stanford we all had to take a course whose title I forget but was taught by David Tyack.  It was a superb seminar largely because David had us read primary texts and Tyack was a phenomenal teacher.  In a quiet, conversational, engaging and funny manner David had us read […]

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The Need for Assistance and Information

I am currently a research assistant on a game that helps high school students understand the process of applying to college. The game, Mission: Admission, which is meant to serve first-generation college attendees and those from disadvantaged backgrounds, offers a learning experience in what high school students should actually do when applying for colleges. Coming […]

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Book Review: The App Generation by Howard Gardner and Katie Davis

I read this and I suppose you should, too. The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World, by Howard Gardner and Katie Davis, is a breezy, easy to read small-sized 244 page book.  Since I’m recommending it, let me offer three quarrels I have with the authors at […]

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In Reponse to Paul Krugman

Today I want to talk about power, or more specifically, the role of power in perpetuating and increasing inequality in the United States. I wasn’t planning on talking about this topic, well not so directly anyway. When I started this series of posts my intention was to limit my musings to the way we collectively […]

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Not Voting in a Time of Crisis

School Board elections are upon us here in Los Angeles. Elections will be held on March 3rd. There are seven Board seats, each representing a different part of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Four of the seven members are up for reelection. There are three contested seats. I know the incumbents who currently hold […]

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If I’m Not Teaching You, I Should Be Fired

Yesterday I said that I was going to spend four days talking about “the ways in which we (collectively) work harder to maintain the status quo than we do to change it.  I will discuss how our actions ultimately prevent us from reaching what we say are our goals.” I am going to spend today […]

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My Love for Public Education

I have been drawn to the field of education ever since high school.  When I was in 11th grade, I told my history teacher, Mrs. Nelson, that I wanted to become a history teacher. She told me she did not recommend I pursue this path. She said it was too much work, too hard, and […]

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