Tag Archives: Innovation

Games—A Matter of Life and Death?

Two weeks ago we were awarded a “First in the World” grant through the Fund for Innovation in Postsecondary Education. The program “provides grants to spur the development of innovations that improve educational outcomes, makes college more affordable for students and families, and develops an evidence base of effective practices.” When I listened to the […]

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Strawberry Fields Forever—But What About IP?

We go to the farmer’s market off of Sunset on Sunday mornings. The fruits and vegetables are great and it’s fun wandering around figuring out what to buy. When strawberries are in season I always buy too many since they are so luscious. I buy the ones up the coast toward Watsonville. I think they’re […]

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Friends, Lovers, and Social Media Experimentation: The Need for New Ethical Guidelines

This summer, Facebook released findings from a controversial study. I blogged about my concerns. Less than a month later, OKCupid’s co-founder publicized his own company’s unethical experiments. What timing. The last six months, in fact, have been filled with troubling examples of data misuse and security leaks—think about it: Facebook, OKCupid, Heartbleed, Bash, and the […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the postsecondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence likely involve fewer tenure-track faculty. The bloom is certainly off […]

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Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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Creating Incentives for People to Save Energy

What incentive do you have to turn off the lights in your office, lower the thermostat in the winter, or power down your computer? Probably not too much. I admit to liking to have my laptop on; it’s sort of a 21st century lava light—always there filling my inbox with e-mails. I don’t think there […]

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A Research Agenda for For-Profit Colleges and Universities

At first glance, the topic of a research agenda for for-profit institutions may seem to be a rather narrow, technical issue, of concern largely to those closely affiliated with those institutions—at most, some of those who work in them, who regulate them, who study them, and maybe even some of those who take courses in […]

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Building an Industry from Seed

Many years ago, when I was first starting my career, an old agricultural banker took me under his wings and would routinely impart sage wisdom. A neophyte, I gobbled up his well digested notions which were based on years of bloody noses I had yet to experience. Now that I have my fair share of […]

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Postsecondary Play

How often do we approach education playfully? Not this last week. My hometown of Santa Barbara is still reeling from the horrendous shooting rampage that tore through Isla Vista. My heart aches for UCSB students and their families, but also for faculty and staff. I have been moved by Facebook posts from USCB professors reaching […]

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