Tag Archives: Higher Education

The Role of an Evaluator

Working with the Mission Admission team is a great pleasure.  The team is a fantastic group of smart, hardworking people who are passionate about education and equity.  The team is full of people who are growing professionally within the education sector.  In the future many people on this project will work with or as an […]

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Getting to College Through Screen

I remember the first time I saw a computer—or at least what I thought was a computer. I was living in El Salvador. My father had gone to work for several days to San Salvador, El Salvador’s capital. This was very unusual. My father was a country man. We lived in the countryside. He never […]

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Top Three Takeaways from First in the World

When I joined the First in the World (FITW) team this January, I brought a unique perspective. I was eager to learn about managing a big project – all of my previous projects had been small or mid-sized. I also was equipped to put this learning in context. As researcher-practitioner specializing in 21st century learning, […]

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Addressing and Innovating Around Entrenched Challenges

Six years ago, the Pullias Center for Higher Education, along with USC’s Game Innovation Lab, launched a project to increase college access through a play-based approach. The rationale informing the project was twofold: to engage students through mediums they enjoyed — and to create a scalable college guidance tool. Over the next few years, educational […]

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Calibrating the Mechanics of Games with the Realities of Students

One of the principles of good educational game design is that you want the actions that players take through your game to meaningfully align with the game’s learning goals. A good rule of thumb is that if you could swap out your game’s topic or narrative with something else, then the mechanics likely only superficially […]

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Qualitative Research as Public Scholarship

At this year’s AERA conference, Bill Tierney and I presented a paper, “The Role of Ethnography as Ethical and Policy-Relevant Public Scholarship.” We had a great panel, including Rob Rhoads, Jessica Lester, Laurence Parker, and Yvonna Lincoln. Fellow blogger Antar chaired. Michelle Fine acted as discussant, providing great commentary. The idea for the symposium developed […]

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Surviving and Thriving in Organizational Politics (Part 2)

As I wrote in yesterday’s blog, there are certain aspects to Surviving and Thriving, which includes learning leadership and having an effective network. Today, I want to look at three other points. Understanding “Expectations” Young leaders often run afoul of the administration of their units because they simply do not take the time to clearly […]

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Surviving and Thriving in Organizational Politics (Part 1)

Considering that graduation season is soon upon us, it seems like an appropriate time to remember that no matter what we do or what our current station is, most of us operate in some sort of organization. And a good time to remind ourselves that surviving and thriving in these institutions requires proactively engaging with […]

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One Forward, Two Back…

Two more, seemingly unrelated stories about sex assault caught my attention in the last few weeks. First, the Chronicle of Higher Ed reported that “Coaches must now step the heck out of sex-assault investigations of players” (3/24/2016). Second, things are blowing up at Baylor over its mishandling of sex assault, also covered by the Chronicle.   […]

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Taking my 6th March Madness Blog Personally

My April blogs each year are my favorites. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of us really know.  When we think of college, our archetypal view are of the 337 Division I schools large enough to field a team. I introduced a game that challenged you to consider some of the […]

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