Tag Archives: Higher Ed

A Tale of the Undocumented (Part 1): A 2000 Mile Journey Across the Border

Nineteen-ninety marked the beginning of a new journey.  My family decided to cross the Rio Grande into the United States. I do not remember much of the journey, since I was only two years old, but my brothers were more aware of the situation at the time. Mexico was facing a recession.  Coming from a […]

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Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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Using Qualitative Research to Contest Stereotypes

How are black men portrayed? After Freddie Gray’s death due to the brutality of six Baltimore police officers, newscasts focused on Gray’s criminal record and suspect behavior. When city residents protested, the media became more interested. Reporters searched for provocative stories and trolled for increased viewership. They showed dehumanizing videos of wild mobs looting and […]

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The Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges

(Written with James Dean Ward) The small private liberal arts college may soon be an endangered species. About one-third of the nation’s approximately 4,500 private nonprofit and for-profit institutions have student bodies of 1,500 students or less. Of these, roughly half, or 750, are experiencing financial pressures because of bond indebtedness, according to a recently […]

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The Wonder of Big Science I

A few months ago Barry and I went up to Vandenberg Air Force Base to watch his rocket ship take off.  About 2,000 individuals who had been working on the project assembled in Buellton the night before the launch.  If you’re looking for a good time, then meeting 1,000 engineers and their families in Buellton […]

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The Student Loan Crisis: Up Close and Personal

Two concerns I have with the current discussion about the student loan crisis is that it is increasingly ideological in nature, and quantitative in the manner in which student financial needs are analyzed: Ideological: Students have too much debt/no they don’t.  More students should to go college/no they shouldn’t.  It’s not the government’s role to […]

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Obama’s Student Aid Bill of Rights: More than a Plea for Customer Service?

I guess I could be more excited about Obama’s Bill of Rights for student loan borrowers, but I’m not really sure why I should be. It kind of bugs me that these basic service expectations have to be pulled together as a “bill of rights” at all. Isn’t this just good customer service? There are […]

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Pricing: Commodity vs. Non-Price Competition

The basic law of economics is that pricing is determined by the supply and demand of a product or service.    This is bad news for the 7000 post-secondary institutions recognized by Department of Education who accept Title IV funding (there are a couple dozen additional universities who refuse to accept federal funds as a matter […]

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In Reponse to Paul Krugman

Today I want to talk about power, or more specifically, the role of power in perpetuating and increasing inequality in the United States. I wasn’t planning on talking about this topic, well not so directly anyway. When I started this series of posts my intention was to limit my musings to the way we collectively […]

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The Purpose of Research: On ROI and DARPA

I have had funded research throughout my academic career.  Even when I worked at Fort Berthold Community College, and long before my doctorate, I wrote grants that advanced the mission of the tribally controlled college.  As a postdoc at the National Center we survived on federal funding by what is now called the Institute of […]

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