Tag Archives: Higher Ed

Christmas 2014

One way to look at this past year is to look forward. Barry retires in August. I have a sabbatical in September and we will go somewhere for a year, probably to India or Turkey. I find out in March. We will return to Hong Kong in May for the second stage of my fellowship […]

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What’s in a Name?

Professor? Dr.? Bill? Since the first day of my Ph.D. program I consistently called all of my instructors Dr. So and So. This was against the norm of most students; students called the faculty members by their first names both to their face and behind closed doors. Along the way I have received some pushback […]

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

I had the great honor this week to be asked by the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics to participate in their technical review panel to develop an alternate measure of income for for-profit colleges and non-degree certificate programs at community colleges who fail the department’s Gainful Employment Eligibility criterion. I felt like […]

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On Community

A month ago I wrote about how mentoring is a two-way street and how much I have gained from those who I have tried to mentor. It got me to thinking about community and our relationship to others. Over the course of my life there have been moments that I have engaged in activities that […]

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I AM Mentoring Program Update

It’s November again and the college application season is in full swing. We (Carlos Galan, Michelle Cadena, and 50 volunteer mentors) have been helping 175 high school seniors apply to college. For California public universities (the University of California [UC] and the California State University [CSU]), the applications are due on Sunday, November 30. This […]

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Quality Grading

When grading, it can be tempting to give a check mark or a letter grade and call it a day; but grading student papers can be a conversation between master and apprentice. The body of research on effective feedback indicates that feedback should be timely, specific, and detailed; the research also shows that the majority […]

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The Elephant in the Hallway: Promises for Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education

I believe that I am a “good teacher.” On most days when I teach I am fully present, minutes never pass slowly, and I am dancing in concert with ideas, actions, and my students. My professional identity is strongly tied to my belief that I am a good teacher, but the evidence I have to […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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Making a Living or Making a Life

For the last several months, I have been serving as the interim CEO for the National Institute of Training and Employment (NITE). It is a very interesting company that is owned by leaders in the higher education private equity sector, Hamilton White and Linden Education. This is a company that focuses on jobs and gets […]

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Transferring Athletic Discipline into Academic Discipline

Any athlete over the long haul has to be disciplined. Some natural athletes can perform at a peak level for a time (think Babe Ruth), but as your body ages it betrays you (think Joe Namath). I’m not a natural athlete but I enjoy physical activity—whether it’s hiking, working out, or running. I enjoy the […]

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