Tag Archives: Higher Ed

Requiem for a Heavyweight

DISCLAIMER – The author is a proud alum of the University of Phoenix and the Apollo Group.  In 1994, Apollo took a chance on me and I took a chance on them.  The next 8 years proved to be the most professionally stimulating period of the author’s career.  Years later, I look back at those […]

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What’s Your Wifi?

I appreciate broadband when I remember dial-up connections. I shudder recalling the glacial pace of my family’s AOL something point O struggling to establish a connection. Most of the time, however, I accept broadband as a fact of life. When I visit friends’ houses, I don’t ask if they have Wi-Fi — I ask for the password. […]

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My Higher Ed Wish List

The past year was an exciting yet troubling time for higher education. Those of us who are dedicated to making institutions more accessible and equitable places for students have a long road ahead in 2016, but we also saw some signs of progress in 2015. As we engage in the holidays and the beginning of […]

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Taking Responsibility

“How to fire federal employees” was the informal name of a workshop I attended a few weeks ago. The workshop wasn’t about getting rid of great or mediocre employees; it was about dealing with toxic, destructive employees. The presentation made me think – so I’m sharing two thoughts that I took away. First, it can […]

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Words from the Project Specialist

Although “Project Specialist” is only one of the many titles I’ve held during my working career, with the First In The World project, it’s never been more accurate. Sure, I specialize in the mechanics of a project, but more so, I’ve embraced that the cross-institution collaboration necessary for a project of this scale depends on […]

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Postdoc Also Means Pre-Job

As I wrote about over the summer, I started as a UC Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Scholar in the Graduate School of Education at UC Riverside. Since the fall is application season and since I’ve been at UCR almost three months now, I figured it would be useful to share a little about the program and what I’ve […]

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A Tale of the Undocumented (Part 1): A 2000 Mile Journey Across the Border

Nineteen-ninety marked the beginning of a new journey.  My family decided to cross the Rio Grande into the United States. I do not remember much of the journey, since I was only two years old, but my brothers were more aware of the situation at the time. Mexico was facing a recession.  Coming from a […]

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Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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Using Qualitative Research to Contest Stereotypes

How are black men portrayed? After Freddie Gray’s death due to the brutality of six Baltimore police officers, news casts focused on Gray’s criminal record and suspect behavior. When city residents protested, the media became more interested. Reporters searched for provocative stories and trolled for increased viewership. They showed dehumanizing videos of wild mobs looting […]

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The Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges

(Written with James Dean Ward) The small private liberal arts college may soon be an endangered species. About one-third of the nation’s approximately 4,500 private nonprofit and for-profit institutions have student bodies of 1,500 students or less. Of these, roughly half, or 750, are experiencing financial pressures because of bond indebtedness, according to a recently […]

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