Tag Archives: High School

Social Media: Academic Freedom for Whom?

One of my professors recommended that I meet with one of her undergraduate students because we shared similar research interests. I met her at a coffee shop on campus.  It seems natural– the second year PhD student sharing experiences with an undergraduate student planning to apply to a doctoral program. We indeed discussed our similar […]

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Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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Book Review: The Tyranny of Meritocracy

I read this and you don’t need to. I approached this book with a great deal of anticipation.  The idea of “merit” is an important notion in American higher education, and Lani Guinier is one of our country’s most thoughtful legal scholars.  The concise 160 page book is also published by Beacon Press so I […]

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Choose a College on Personal Fit, Not Rankings

While I was working at a shared writing center between the University of Central Florida and Daytona State College, the president of Daytona State surprised the community of 30,000 students and assorted faculty with an impromptu campus-wide celebration.  During a speech in which employee attendance was mandatory, the big news was announced: Daytona State had […]

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Rethinking How to Bridge the Digital Divide

You take a kid from the inner city, and bring her into an after-school program where she is given the lastest iPad, an Arduino Mega 2560 (with shields).  She also has unencumbered access to a laser cutter. You show her how to make three dimensional objects on the laser cutter, teach her how to program […]

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The Need for Assistance and Information

I am currently a research assistant on a game that helps high school students understand the process of applying to college. The game, Mission: Admission, which is meant to serve first-generation college attendees and those from disadvantaged backgrounds, offers a learning experience in what high school students should actually do when applying for colleges. Coming […]

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Book Review: The App Generation by Howard Gardner and Katie Davis

I read this and I suppose you should, too. The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World, by Howard Gardner and Katie Davis, is a breezy, easy to read small-sized 244 page book.  Since I’m recommending it, let me offer three quarrels I have with the authors at […]

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Thoughts on Building an Innovation State

Last week, Janet Napolitano, the current President of the University of California system, gave the annual Pullias Lecture at USC.  The transcript of her speech, entitled “A Trifecta for the Future: Higher Education, California, and Innovation,” can be found here.  Having never seen Napolitano speak in person before, I was immediately struck by her commanding […]

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If I’m Not Teaching You, I Should Be Fired

Yesterday I said that I was going to spend four days talking about “the ways in which we (collectively) work harder to maintain the status quo than we do to change it.  I will discuss how our actions ultimately prevent us from reaching what we say are our goals.” I am going to spend today […]

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My Love for Public Education

I have been drawn to the field of education ever since high school.  When I was in 11th grade, I told my history teacher, Mrs. Nelson, that I wanted to become a history teacher. She told me she did not recommend I pursue this path. She said it was too much work, too hard, and […]

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