Tag Archives: High School

Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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Training Undergraduates for Disciplinary Writing and Research

Imagine, for a moment, you are a world-class athlete training at a top Division 1 university as a track specialist in the 110-meter hurdles. For several years, you have endeavored to acquire several event-specific abilities that are fundamentally important for success in your event. Speed, of course, is a necessity, so the fast-twitch fibers in […]

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Ten Ways to Improve Educational Outcomes for Low-Income Youth

Double the minimum wage Create a full employment economy Give homeless youth a home End hunger Provide universal health care Treat mental illness Reduce incarceration Reduce income inequality Reduce the dropout rate Provide maternity and infant care Is there any that doubt if we did even half of these, educational outcomes would increase? If so, […]

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Graduates and Servants

What does it mean to be an indentured servant? Ask a senior in a selective college and you might be surprised by his or her answer. This semester I interviewed over 30 undergraduate juniors and seniors about financial aid, and one interview in particular stands out. I spoke with a graduating senior who had already […]

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Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

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Mid-Program Reflection … SummerTIME 2014

We’re in the middle of our annual SummerTIME Program. The students arrived last Monday and they’re with us until next Wednesday. This is my seventh year being involved in SummerTIME and my first year directing it on my own. I’m lucky to have a handful of dedicated student workers and a full-time assistant—most of which […]

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Financial Literacy Can Start in K–12 Schools

Last year, I studied the decision-making processes of graduate students enrolled in master’s programs with Dr. Kristan Venegas and colleagues in the Rossier Ed.D. program. One of our most interesting findings was that an overwhelming majority of master’s-level students had not given a considerable amount of thought to the repayment of their educational loans, saying […]

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Postsecondary Play

How often do we approach education playfully? Not this last week. My hometown of Santa Barbara is still reeling from the horrendous shooting rampage that tore through Isla Vista. My heart aches for UCSB students and their families, but also for faculty and staff. I have been moved by Facebook posts from USCB professors reaching […]

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Foster Youth and College

Over 400,000 young people live in foster care in the United States. By the time a foster youth reaches high school, his likelihood of experiencing multiple residential placements is extremely high—most high school-aged foster youth have lived in over five placements. With each residential move, children are often required to change in schools as well. […]

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The Digital Bookshelf of an Assistant Professor

Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus is one of my favorite plays. At the beginning of the story, Faustus, surrounded by countless dusty tomes, declares that he has read everything about everything. I’m not sure what it says about me (especially given Faustus’ fate), but I frequently think about that scene. I read a lot. I eagerly […]

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