Tag Archives: Graduate Students

On the Job Market

On the job market… These are stressful words for anyone looking for work. As a current postdoc looking for employment, I write to share what I’ve learned from this past semester of being in the thick of it. Starting Printing out the job call then reading it through with a highlighter and pen helps me. It […]

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Tips for Ph.D. Students Revisited

My last blog received positive feedback, so I decided to add a couple more tips for the end of the year. Rather than focusing on coursework, I thought it might be helpful to offer three broad suggestions about surviving the first couple of semesters in a Ph.D. program: 1) Try not to spread yourself too […]

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Going Off Campus: What Any Employee Wants

Part of the work I do with the FDA is helping units understand their scores on the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. The process we use is a series of focus groups with different levels of employees to explore the top and bottom ten items, according to their responses, from that survey. Over the last […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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College Branding: An Oversimplification of Complex Institutional Identities?

When I was seventeen years old, I was one of approximately 150 eleventh and twelfth grade students selected to the Florida All-State Symphonic Band. During the week-long festival, a number of colleges and universities set up recruitment tables during a specified “College Night,” intending to bolster their music programs with students who had already demonstrated […]

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Why Is It So Hard to Help?

“But I don’t understand what this video has to do with our section on plant cells, Dr. Berry.” My twelfth grade biology teacher replied, “If you’re not going to watch the video, you can go to the principal’s office.” “That’s cool, it’s probably more productive than this.” Dr. Berry sighed and turned the TV on. […]

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Teaching and Grading

Over the last two days, I graded 28 student papers. And I enjoyed it. It was great to see the growth of my students’ ideas and further development of their writing skills in just five weeks. I was sharing about how much I enjoyed grading these papers with another group of college students and more […]

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Doctoral Training and Innovation for Qualitative Researchers

One of the principal tasks of a research university is to train doctoral students to be able to design and conduct quality research studies. Optimally, training includes a mixture of theory and practice, coursework and experience. While a student marches to class to learn about research techniques, she also conducts research as part of major […]

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Discussing Power, Privilege and Identity in the Classroom

I’m teaching a course this fall called “Creating Communities of Interest” in our Educational Counseling program. We’re going to talk about power, privilege and identity in our next class meeting. I’m nervous about it. I’ve prepared for the class meeting.  I have plans for how to get the discussion going.  But I’m always worried when I talk […]

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Plato at the Start of the School Year

September is upon us and another school year begins afresh. States give tax free days so parents can refresh school supplies. Old Navy and the Gap are completely replenished for those who don’t require school uniforms. New text books are issued (Do they still require covering as in ages past? Probably not because the turnover is so quick). […]

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