Tag Archives: Four-year College

Do We Really Need More STEM Graduates?

A common assumption is that there is a desperate need for more students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).  Almost everyone believes it – which is why schools of engineering, for example, are experiencing a boom, and history departments are a bust.  Administrators, faculty, students, parents, and policymakers all argue that we’re throwing good […]

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Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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Escaping the Digital

“What’s the Point of a Professor” was a New York Times opinion piece by Mark Bauerlein that has generated wide response and conversation about the role of the professor in the 21st century. Bauerlein argues that professors are becoming more like “accreditors” and fail to inspire and invest in students like the professors of old. Although […]

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It’s Financial Aid in the Media Season Again!

It’s financial aid in the media season again! From February to June, there will be a smattering of financial aid articles and interviews in the popular media. I typically try not to get rant-y in my blog posts, but this article from MarketWatch last month really bugged me. The story focuses on four insider tips to […]

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Invisible User

“I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me… When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me,” Ralph Ellison wrote in his Invisible Man. I am a Black man and in some spaces, because of this identity, I battle the […]

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Book Review: The Tyranny of Meritocracy

I read this and you don’t need to. I approached this book with a great deal of anticipation.  The idea of “merit” is an important notion in American higher education, and Lani Guinier is one of our country’s most thoughtful legal scholars.  The concise 160 page book is also published by Beacon Press so I […]

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Let’s Talk About Access

I want to talk about two things, skills and structures.  Let’s start with some numbers about social media and computer science. According to the most recent Pew Research Report, 83% of African American teens play video games, which is more than any other group. Forty five percent of Black teens reported using twitter. Sixty-four percent […]

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Choose a College on Personal Fit, Not Rankings

While I was working at a shared writing center between the University of Central Florida and Daytona State College, the president of Daytona State surprised the community of 30,000 students and assorted faculty with an impromptu campus-wide celebration.  During a speech in which employee attendance was mandatory, the big news was announced: Daytona State had […]

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This is my 5th March Madness Blog

My April blog each year are my favorites.    Hard to imagine this is my 5th.   Special thanks to Bill Tierney for encouraging our progressive look at higher education and for providing an outlet for such high jinx.  Above map can be found here. My first piece in 2011 talked about how few colleges most of […]

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On Academic Life: The End of the Circle

It was not long ago (in my mind, anyway) that I entered graduate school, earned my doctorate, and began a career as an academic. I did not have a clue as to where the journey would take me…and I suddenly find myself nearing the end of that journey. In previous posts I tried to point […]

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