Tag Archives: Four-year College

Games—A Matter of Life and Death?

Two weeks ago we were awarded a “First in the World” grant through the Fund for Innovation in Postsecondary Education. The program “provides grants to spur the development of innovations that improve educational outcomes, makes college more affordable for students and families, and develops an evidence base of effective practices.” When I listened to the […]

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California DREAM Loan Program

A few weeks back, California Governor Jerry Brown signed California Senate Bill 1210 (SB 1210) into law. SB 1210 establishes the California DREAM Loan Program for undocumented immigrant students attending the California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC). In short, undocumented immigrant students who qualify for reduced in-state academic fees (AB 540), […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the postsecondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence likely involve fewer tenure-track faculty. The bloom is certainly off […]

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Where Will I Send My High Achieving Latina Daughter to College?

First it’s important to note, this is not a humble brag blog entry, this is a post written out of serious worry about future educational opportunities, and not just for my kid of color. In California, if you are born after September 2, you have to attend “Transitional Kindergarten (TK)” and then begin regular Kindergarten […]

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Good Stuff x 2

During the 2014–2015 school year, I am very much looking forward to piloting wrap-around curriculum for the games we developed in collaboration with the USC Game Innovation Lab. The first up is FutureBound. FutureBound is a game designed to engage middle school students in learning about college. Through game play, students develop an understanding for […]

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Where’s Rieber Hall?

Late one night last fall, I ended up driving through the UCLA campus after the LA Metro Transportation Authority, Caltrans, and Kiewit decided to reroute me and other drivers off the 405 freeway for the one-millionth time in the last five years, but I digress. I attended UCLA as an undergrad and then worked as […]

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The Revolution is Now?

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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The Ivory Tower—An Investment or a Gamble

While planning to review Ivory Tower, Andrew Rossi’s inventive documentary about higher education, I felt fortunate to have an arts house landmark theatre in St Louis. But I had a friend visiting for the weekend, so I sat alone at the noon showing at the Tivoli theatre in the University City Loop. It was an […]

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Graduates and Servants

What does it mean to be an indentured servant? Ask a senior in a selective college and you might be surprised by his or her answer. This semester I interviewed over 30 undergraduate juniors and seniors about financial aid, and one interview in particular stands out. I spoke with a graduating senior who had already […]

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Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

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