Tag Archives: Four-year College

The Centrality of Due Process in Sexual Assault Adjudication

The news last month hit very close to home. USC lost on appeal its suspension of a student accused of sexual assault. There are two reasons a decision could be overturned—procedural errors or a determination about the evidence. For this blog, I’ll focus on the issue of procedural errors, an element in the decision against USC […]

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Addressing and Innovating Around Entrenched Challenges

Six years ago, the Pullias Center for Higher Education, along with USC’s Game Innovation Lab, launched a project to increase college access through a play-based approach. The rationale informing the project was twofold: to engage students through mediums they enjoyed — and to create a scalable college guidance tool. Over the next few years, educational […]

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Calibrating the Mechanics of Games with the Realities of Students

One of the principles of good educational game design is that you want the actions that players take through your game to meaningfully align with the game’s learning goals. A good rule of thumb is that if you could swap out your game’s topic or narrative with something else, then the mechanics likely only superficially […]

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The E in STEM

In addition to my Ph.D. from Rossier this past year, I also earned my M.A. in economics. I’ve become more and more interested in learning more about the representation of students of color and women of color in economics degree programs. The national focus on increasing the number of underrepresented minorities (URM) in STEM (Science, […]

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Why “Between the World and Me” is Required Reading

1. Written as a letter from father to son, Between the World and Me chronicles key moments in Ta-Nehisi Coates’ life. Imparting lessons to his son and the reader, the author, who contributes to The Atlantic, presents an unidealized portrait of America and its history of racial injustice and violence. The emotional center of the […]

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Inside the Cardinal and Gold Curtain: Embracing Opportunities for College Access

Improving college access and opportunity for students of low income and historically underserved groups depends on the adults in their lives and the tenacity of the individual students to take risks those adults may or may not encourage them to pursue. How the student learns what choices are available and the certain realities leading to […]

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First 8 Days of February: Journaling Race

February 12, 2016 Dear Diary, Race is salient and ever present in my academic life. I don’t have to look for it, it finds me. Part I. Veteranas & Rucas There is this KCET article on Facebook about an Instagram feed called Veteranas_and_Rucas, which focuses largely on the Chicano party scene in Southern California in […]

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My Higher Ed Wish List

The past year was an exciting yet troubling time for higher education. Those of us who are dedicated to making institutions more accessible and equitable places for students have a long road ahead in 2016, but we also saw some signs of progress in 2015. As we engage in the holidays and the beginning of […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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India Part One – The Beginning: Indian Higher Education’s Half-Full Glass

I had the opportunity recently to review the applications of Indian academics who have applied for Fulbrights to the United States. It was one of those fun, time-consuming experiences that academics complain about because of the time commitment but actually enjoy a great deal because we get to learn a lot.  A few hundred applications […]

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