Tag Archives: featured

Graduate Students in Debt & the Money Taboo

Last month I wrote a post about the newly released documentary, Ivory Tower. My post (and the film) was primarily concerning the student debt crisis facing higher education in general with a focus on the rise in student loan debt of undergraduate students in recent decades. But, what was not addressed in the film was […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

1 Comment Continue Reading →

Training Undergraduates for Disciplinary Writing and Research

Imagine, for a moment, you are a world-class athlete training at a top Division 1 university as a track specialist in the 110-meter hurdles. For several years, you have endeavored to acquire several event-specific abilities that are fundamentally important for success in your event. Speed, of course, is a necessity, so the fast-twitch fibers in […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Creating Incentives for People to Save Energy

What incentive do you have to turn off the lights in your office, lower the thermostat in the winter, or power down your computer? Probably not too much. I admit to liking to have my laptop on; it’s sort of a 21st century lava light—always there filling my inbox with e-mails. I don’t think there […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

From Footnotes to the Center of the Text

As Michael Lujan Bevacqua writes, the island of Guam (Guåhan), is “one big American footnote”: My island is one big American footnote, Sitting black/brown as day on the bottom of every red, whitewashed and blue page Through textual treaties or wars these narrow margins are our new, now, old or eternal homes Read the rest […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

The Ivory Tower—An Investment or a Gamble

While planning to review Ivory Tower, Andrew Rossi’s inventive documentary about higher education, I felt fortunate to have an arts house landmark theatre in St Louis. But I had a friend visiting for the weekend, so I sat alone at the noon showing at the Tivoli theatre in the University City Loop. It was an […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

A Research Agenda for For-Profit Colleges and Universities

At first glance, the topic of a research agenda for for-profit institutions may seem to be a rather narrow, technical issue, of concern largely to those closely affiliated with those institutions—at most, some of those who work in them, who regulate them, who study them, and maybe even some of those who take courses in […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Outsourcing and Its Consequences IV: Final Considerations

This is the fourth installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here. Last year, the California State Legislature considered outsourcing courses to external providers. The Democratic-controlled legislature was troubled that students could not get the classes they needed. The […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →