Tag Archives: Faculty

Rethinking the Foundations of Higher Education

The Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) has played a substantial role in developing content in the field through the publication of ASHE readers. These texts essentially reproduce noteworthy articles, papers, and chapters as textbooks that can be used in core courses. Advancing Higher Education as a Field of Study (edited by Sydney […]

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Cross-Generation Struggle for Fairness in Academe

Court cases about affirmative action, including the Supreme Court’s recent Fisher decision, are often brought into the spotlight by researchers and the press, but the daily decisions that undermine social justice in universities frequently go uncontested. The values and prejudices embedded in academic systems have not only created barriers for minorities in admissions, hiring and […]

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On Bargaining

Over the years lots of individuals have asked me how to negotiate for a new faculty position, a new job, a raise, or a promotion.  There are three basic rules to follow: Don’t be a doormat:  Rarely do I hear of positions where there is zero negotiation.  I know it’s nice to have a job, […]

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Christmas 2014

One way to look at this past year is to look forward. Barry retires in August. I have a sabbatical in September and we will go somewhere for a year, probably to India or Turkey. I find out in March. We will return to Hong Kong in May for the second stage of my fellowship […]

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What’s in a Name?

Professor? Dr.? Bill? Since the first day of my Ph.D. program I consistently called all of my instructors Dr. So and So. This was against the norm of most students; students called the faculty members by their first names both to their face and behind closed doors. Along the way I have received some pushback […]

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Quality Instruction

When considering quality instruction, I often think about the age-old question “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Does quality instruction emerge through finely crafted standards and top-of the-line curriculum and text materials or does quality instruction come from a quality professor? After pondering this for about 20 years, as a public school teacher […]

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The Elephant in the Hallway: Promises for Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education

I believe that I am a “good teacher.” On most days when I teach I am fully present, minutes never pass slowly, and I am dancing in concert with ideas, actions, and my students. My professional identity is strongly tied to my belief that I am a good teacher, but the evidence I have to […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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The Rabbit, the Fox, and the Wolf

Just before I switched to my current advisor a little over halfway through my program, I received this from him in an email: The Rabbit, the Fox, and the Wolf One sunny day a rabbit came out of her hole in the ground to enjoy the fine weather. The day was so nice that she […]

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The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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