Tag Archives: Faculty

Getting on (Tenure) Track

Effective June 30th, I’ll be a Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Higher Education at UC Riverside.  As I prepare for this reality, I’ve started receiving and sorting through a lot of advice.  Here I share 5 points that I plan to adhere to in no particular order. 1. To write is right The most popular […]

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Qualitative Research as Public Scholarship

At this year’s AERA conference, Bill Tierney and I presented a paper, “The Role of Ethnography as Ethical and Policy-Relevant Public Scholarship.” We had a great panel, including Rob Rhoads, Jessica Lester, Laurence Parker, and Yvonna Lincoln. Fellow blogger Antar chaired. Michelle Fine acted as discussant, providing great commentary. The idea for the symposium developed […]

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Surviving and Thriving in Organizational Politics (Part 2)

As I wrote in yesterday’s blog, there are certain aspects to Surviving and Thriving, which includes learning leadership and having an effective network. Today, I want to look at three other points. Understanding “Expectations” Young leaders often run afoul of the administration of their units because they simply do not take the time to clearly […]

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Thank You, Don Nakanishi! RIP

A good portion of my adult years was working in the Asian Pacific American community.  From 1992 through 2014, I worked or volunteered for:  Asian Pacific AIDS Intervention Team, API Equality-LA, East West Players, Gay Asian Pacific Support Network, API Pride Council, Barangay and the California Commission on API Affairs.  Through that time, Don Nakanishi’s […]

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What’s Up With Cal? (Psst: Not as Much as We’d Like)

If you’ve been following the LA Times or the Chronicle of Higher Education, you may have lost count: in the past months, at least four faculty and staff at UC Berkeley have left their positions after being accused of sexual harassment.  Among the body count: the law school dean, a vice chancellor, an astronomer and, […]

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First 8 days of March: More Journaling Race

Hello Diary, Just as I documented in my blog last month, race is salient and ever present in my academic life. I don’t have to look for it, it finds me. My motivation for sharing this is to show how one can make daily decisions to advocate for racial equity and cultural differences (or not). […]

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Going Off-Campus: How We Measure Success

Almost every organization has a mission. How we measure success toward that mission is a challenge. How do we, in the USC Rossier School, for example, know we’ve improved urban education, and how much improvement is “enough?” For my current, adopted home, CDER, what does “helping to ensure” access to safe and effective drugs mean? […]

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Phyllis Schlafley and I Go Way Back

Phyllis Schlafley and I go way back. She plagued me in the late 1970s when I was a college student. I had been sexually assaulted in the first semester of my freshman year, and was struggling with feelings of shame and rage. I watched her almost single-handedly engineer the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment […]

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Selective Silence

About two weeks ago, I shut down my Facebook to the bare minimum. I use Facebook as a means to communicate with friends and family, but also with the academic community that I am a part of. Between the terrorist attacks globally, the ongoing murders of men of color in the US, and the ongoing […]

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Don’t Confuse Me with the Facts – Higher Education’s Next Mission

Americans don’t seem too concerned with “Exaggerations.”  Donald Trump saw thousands of Muslims in Jersey City celebrating the collapse of the World Trade Center.  Ben Carson is certain that the Biblical Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.  Birthers are certain that our president was born in Africa even after he produced a birth certificate issued in Hawaii.  We […]

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