Tag Archives: Faculty

Where Will I Send My High Achieving Latina Daughter to College?

First it’s important to note, this is not a humble brag blog entry, this is a post written out of serious worry about future educational opportunities, and not just for my kid of color. In California, if you are born after September 2, you have to attend “Transitional Kindergarten (TK)” and then begin regular Kindergarten […]

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In Honor of William B. Michael—Can We Deconstruct a College Education Statistically?

It doesn’t seem right that another September is upon us and Bill Michael (William B. Michael) is not ambling slowly through Waite Phillips Hall, ready to at once terrorize and fascinate wary graduate students required to learn something about research methods and statistics. A giant in the field, Bill would constantly regale his nervous students […]

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Moving to Full Professor III

We all love lists. We also like transparency. “I don’t know what to do” certainly sounds like a downer. Advice (if it’s correct!) also can be very helpful. But honestly, the last two blogs (located here and here) were a downer for me. I never thought of academic life as a checklist. I never went […]

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Moving to Full Professor II

What’s missing from the list I presented? Editing. I wrote about editing in a previous blog. Editing is something I have enjoyed but does not earn very many direct plaudits. There are also tiers of editing. Editing a university press book is more important than editing something from a third-tier press. Training grants and such. […]

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Moving to Full Professor I

People have asked me what it takes to move from associate to full professor. One of the problems in giving advice is that once something is written down it becomes a “rule.” Caveat emptor! These are not rules. They are opinions and thoughts that have gone, and continue to go, through reformulation. I want to […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences IV: Final Considerations

This is the fourth installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here. Last year, the California State Legislature considered outsourcing courses to external providers. The Democratic-controlled legislature was troubled that students could not get the classes they needed. The […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences III: “Lead Generation” and Slippery Slopes in Higher Education

This is the third installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here and Part II is here. Until September 2013, the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) prohibited the use of commissioned agents in international student recruitment. There are numerous purist reasons to disdain what has come […]

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Stats, Stories, and Policy Design

In my last post, I mentioned Illinois’ new testing plan, which sets different testing standards based on student demographics including race and class. The policy oozes the flawed logic that has defined the accountability era: Statistics—and experimental and quasi-experimental studies, in particular—represent the gold standard of educational research. Before you either tune me in or […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences II: The Philosophical and Ethical Issues Raised by Outsourcing

Apart from the economic premises I raised earlier, outsourcing is also a philosophical principle about how an organization should run its affairs. Once an institution agrees that outsourcing is a credible way to manage resources, it ends up on that proverbial “slippery slope.” I am not suggesting that outsourcing is inherently wrong or ought never […]

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