Tag Archives: Crisis

Social Media: Academic Freedom for Whom?

One of my professors recommended that I meet with one of her undergraduate students because we shared similar research interests. I met her at a coffee shop on campus.  It seems natural– the second year PhD student sharing experiences with an undergraduate student planning to apply to a doctoral program. We indeed discussed our similar […]

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When Entrepreneurialism “Disrupts” Academic and Artistic Rigor

Imagine, for a moment, the following scenario: A department of economics, with an internationally-respected, highly-selective graduate program that provides full funding for PhD students, receives a $70 million donation from a capital venture fund.  The donation, introduced by prominent figures from the financial investment world (perhaps Robert Kraft or James Dimon), is earmarked for the […]

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Using Qualitative Research to Contest Stereotypes

How are black men portrayed? After Freddie Gray’s death due to the brutality of six Baltimore police officers, newscasts focused on Gray’s criminal record and suspect behavior. When city residents protested, the media became more interested. Reporters searched for provocative stories and trolled for increased viewership. They showed dehumanizing videos of wild mobs looting and […]

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Creativity: The Key to Future Employment?

This week, while canvassing for research that might help my end-of-semester papers, I came across a recently published report filled with interesting accounts about the difficulties Millennials in California are facing on the job market.  Seemingly every month, similar reports lament the perceived inadequacies of the U.S. workforce.  Many narratives promote a greater investment in […]

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The Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges

(Written with James Dean Ward) The small private liberal arts college may soon be an endangered species. About one-third of the nation’s approximately 4,500 private nonprofit and for-profit institutions have student bodies of 1,500 students or less. Of these, roughly half, or 750, are experiencing financial pressures because of bond indebtedness, according to a recently […]

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Controlling for Race – The Silence of Education Researchers

Topics are always more complex than they seem.  As scholars we learn about the nuances and context-specific issues of various issues. To better understand issues, we often employ theoretical frameworks. Theoretical frameworks are like the lenses we use to see and analyze data.  Scholars may use different frameworks to look at the same phenomena and […]

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Book Review: The Tyranny of Meritocracy

I read this and you don’t need to. I approached this book with a great deal of anticipation.  The idea of “merit” is an important notion in American higher education, and Lani Guinier is one of our country’s most thoughtful legal scholars.  The concise 160 page book is also published by Beacon Press so I […]

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What Is Collegial in Higher Education?

The idea of “collegiality,” an important concept for any academic institution, has been on my mind over the past couple of weeks.  Simply put, collegiality is a cooperative relationship between colleagues founded upon respect.  Virtually no one relishes abrasive confrontation, particularly when an individual’s response seems out of proportion to the importance of the issue […]

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Indiana, Duke, Yik Yak, and the purpose of Education

The news has been full of lamentable examples of bigotry and discrimination. The governor of Indiana signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, legislation that permits businesses to discriminate on the basis of religion—a restaurant, for instance, could refuse service to a gay couple. The politician posed the law as a moral argument; and yet, any […]

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Let’s Talk About Access

I want to talk about two things, skills and structures.  Let’s start with some numbers about social media and computer science. According to the most recent Pew Research Report, 83% of African American teens play video games, which is more than any other group. Forty five percent of Black teens reported using twitter. Sixty-four percent […]

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