Tag Archives: Crisis

Indiana, Duke, Yik Yak, and the purpose of Education

The news has been full of lamentable examples of bigotry and discrimination. The governor of Indiana signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, legislation that permits businesses to discriminate on the basis of religion—a restaurant, for instance, could refuse service to a gay couple. The politician posed the law as a moral argument; and yet, any […]

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Let’s Talk About Access

I want to talk about two things, skills and structures.  Let’s start with some numbers about social media and computer science. According to the most recent Pew Research Report, 83% of African American teens play video games, which is more than any other group. Forty five percent of Black teens reported using twitter. Sixty-four percent […]

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What’s Going On?

So this blog has nothing to do with formal education, but it has everything to do about informal education and survival. I have two little kids. They play with other kids. They have conflicts, because well, they are kids, and this is a time when they are supposed to be working this stuff out. Tonight, […]

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Boards of Higher Education–The Elephant in the Room

I wrote my dissertation on governing boards.  While I continue to be interested in the role and influence of boards in higher education, I wonder why others aren’t.  Or at least I wonder why we don’t talk more about boards and want to know more about them.  After all, Terry MacTaggart has said that no […]

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Let’s Get Clear about Sexual Assault Prevention

Note: This essay will make more sense if you have read the 9/22/14 blog beforehand. That blog addresses misconceptions about the perpetrators of sexual assault. In this essay, I want to extend that conversation by talking about the implications for prevention work. I’m going to oversimplify concepts here, and I am aware that I am […]

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A Complex Problem

This week I return as blogger and coincidentally, the topic of sexual assault on college campuses has returned to the news. I will use four posts this week to go deeper into the complex problem of preventing sexual assault on college campuses. The issues being debated in Congress and being acted upon in Virginia can […]

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Thoughts on Building an Innovation State

Last week, Janet Napolitano, the current President of the University of California system, gave the annual Pullias Lecture at USC.  The transcript of her speech, entitled “A Trifecta for the Future: Higher Education, California, and Innovation,” can be found here.  Having never seen Napolitano speak in person before, I was immediately struck by her commanding […]

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The Role of Laws and Policies in Maintaining the Status Quo

Today I turn my attention to federal and state laws and policies, particularly the ways in which they are implemented that inadvertently (or possibly intentionally) maintain the status quo. I am choosing to talk about law and policy and the implementation of law and policy because they are inextricably intertwined with each other. A law […]

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Recognizing the Trajectory Toward Inequality

In his term as president of the American Education Research Association, Bill Tierney focused on inequity in education. Recently, he edited a volume with Johns Hopkins University Press, Rethinking Education and Poverty, that will help raise the awareness of researchers that focus on inequality in K-12 and higher education. After reviewing the draft chapters, I […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the postsecondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence likely involve fewer tenure-track faculty. The bloom is certainly off […]

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