Tag Archives: College Access

Measuring Learning

The measurement of learning, at its core, is the measurement of change. I hope when students engage with “Mission: Admission,” originally created by faculty and game developers at the USC Rossier School of Education and the USC School of Cinematic Arts (and generously supported by the First in the World Grant), that they learn about […]

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SMH & the Collective Gasp: Talking About Race and Racism in 2015

I’ve been sitting in meetings and job talks, and following Twitter and Facebook, reading blogs, and newspaper articles about race more recently. My cousin even recently sent me a long article about a specific incident and asked me to read and discuss with him via online chat. Part of this is because of all of […]

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I Know You Can Do It

In an introductory YouTube video about FutureBound (previously known as Collegeology), Bill Tierney talks about the challenges many underprivileged students face and the lack of postsecondary educational opportunities available to them. He finishes his segment by asking…How do you deal with that?  You’ve got to have someone in your corner saying, “You can do it. […]

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Considering the German Vocational Model

Proponents of vocational education often point to Germany as a model.  Germany certainly has an enviable unemployment rate (4.8% in December 2014), and its apprenticeship programs, conducted in tandem with vocational colleges, are often credited with this success.  As a result, influential business commentators like Harold Sirkin argue that the United States should emulate Germany’s […]

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More Than A Game

What do we want to learn from our research (funded by the First in the World Grant) on the game-based intervention for college-going? We have in Mission Admission a colorful, interactive online game that could potentially influence students’ college identities.  It’s easy to get sucked into the game.  After all, it is the central component […]

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On the Purpose of Education – Part 2

In my last post, I asked if the primary purpose of education is to find a job.  Since then, at least two developments have engendered a considerable amount of discussion around that very topic.  On January 26, an article entitled “The Day the Purpose of College Changed” by Dan Barrett from the Chronicle of Higher […]

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Research Focusing of Promoting Equity

With the reversal, starting in the late 1970s, of this nation’s century-long trajectory toward economic and educational fairness, we need to rethink how to promote fairness and social justice. Given the pervasive use of market mechanisms in higher education and urban schools, this is especially urgent. In particular, the notion that there are pipelines to […]

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Recognizing the Trajectory Toward Inequality

In his term as president of the American Education Research Association, Bill Tierney focused on inequity in education. Recently, he edited a volume with Johns Hopkins University Press, Rethinking Education and Poverty, that will help raise the awareness of researchers that focus on inequality in K-12 and higher education. After reviewing the draft chapters, I […]

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On the Purpose of Education – Part 1

About five years ago, I had the opportunity to visit a high school in the American midwest that prepared students for careers in the construction industry.  I found the school intriguing for a number of reasons.  In promotional brochures, the primary selling point of the school was the industry’s high earning potential for graduates.  Certified […]

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

I had the great honor this week to be asked by the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics to participate in their technical review panel to develop an alternate measure of income for for-profit colleges and non-degree certificate programs at community colleges who fail the department’s Gainful Employment Eligibility criterion. I felt like […]

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