Tag Archives: College Access

Social Media: Academic Freedom for Whom?

One of my professors recommended that I meet with one of her undergraduate students because we shared similar research interests. I met her at a coffee shop on campus.  It seems natural– the second year PhD student sharing experiences with an undergraduate student planning to apply to a doctoral program. We indeed discussed our similar […]

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Mergers and Aquisitions

It’s March 2011. California’s next governor calls a morning news conference to make a stunning announcement: The Apollo Group’s University of Phoenix will pay $2.3 billion to buy the California State University system. “The previous administration left us with few alternatives,” explains the new governor, who won election on a campaign pledge to end California’s […]

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The Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges

(Written with James Dean Ward) The small private liberal arts college may soon be an endangered species. About one-third of the nation’s approximately 4,500 private nonprofit and for-profit institutions have student bodies of 1,500 students or less. Of these, roughly half, or 750, are experiencing financial pressures because of bond indebtedness, according to a recently […]

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A Digital Safe Space

I first heard the phrase “safe space” as a freshman at Brown University during the school’s Third World Transition Program.  This program was an orientation for freshmen from historically underrepresented ethnic and racial groups. Throughout the three-day orientation, we discussed the “-isms” (e.g. racism, sexism, classism) and I heard variants of the following two phrases […]

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Everything Old is New Again

Enjoy this video, by clicking HERE. It may be the last smile for this blog. I promised in my March piece that I would continue my theme of Non-Price competition and why non-selective colleges were ill prepared to consider this pricing strategy.  However, this week’s actions so rocked the education environment that I am compelled to […]

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Can Online Education Foster Social Intelligence?

Lately, I have been interviewing several community college students who have expressed an interest in becoming primary and secondary teachers.  Much of their coursework, thus far, involves a mixture of face-to-face and online classes.  Almost all of the students I interviewed prefer face-to-face classes over online classes for a number of well-known reasons, including the […]

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Let’s Talk About Access

I want to talk about two things, skills and structures.  Let’s start with some numbers about social media and computer science. According to the most recent Pew Research Report, 83% of African American teens play video games, which is more than any other group. Forty five percent of Black teens reported using twitter. Sixty-four percent […]

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Choose a College on Personal Fit, Not Rankings

While I was working at a shared writing center between the University of Central Florida and Daytona State College, the president of Daytona State surprised the community of 30,000 students and assorted faculty with an impromptu campus-wide celebration.  During a speech in which employee attendance was mandatory, the big news was announced: Daytona State had […]

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Rethinking How to Bridge the Digital Divide

You take a kid from the inner city, and bring her into an after-school program where she is given the lastest iPad, an Arduino Mega 2560 (with shields).  She also has unencumbered access to a laser cutter. You show her how to make three dimensional objects on the laser cutter, teach her how to program […]

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Book Review: The Teacher Wars – Dana Goldstein (I read this and you should, too.)

As a first-year PhD student at Stanford we all had to take a course whose title I forget but was taught by David Tyack.  It was a superb seminar largely because David had us read primary texts and Tyack was a phenomenal teacher.  In a quiet, conversational, engaging and funny manner David had us read […]

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