Tag Archives: College Access

Change from the Inside

Some think that the For-Profit Higher Education Industry in the United States is on life support.  In May, Corinthian Colleges, filed for Chapter 11 protection and closed its doors, leaving thousands of students without a college to go to and millions (perhaps billions) of dollars in loans for the government to forgive.  The largest and best […]

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The Veil of Perfection: Academic (In)Vulnerability

In light of the blog I posted last week, I started to think about constructive ways to think about talking about race, racism, and seemingly difficult topics. I want to be clear, I’m not writing this as a pundit on race or Black Studies, because I’m not—I’m writing this simply as a Black man. There […]

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Melting in Summer

In the summer after high school graduation, many college-intending students often discover themselves to be without the crucial knowledge, resources and direction necessary to smoothly transition to college.  Though they’ve completed all the high school requirements, been accepted to at least one college, applied for financial aid, and indicated their plans to enroll in postsecondary […]

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Marketing the College Experience: A Problem for the Online University?

Recently, over 3,000 students who applied to the University of Florida for their undergraduate education received welcome news of their acceptance… with a single caveat: they had to take their entire first year of classes online. Back in September 2013, Florida Governor Rick Scott authorized the creation of UF Online, allocating $35 million over five years […]

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Higher Education in Hong Kong

For the last month I have been in residence as a Fellow at the University of Hong Kong.  The Fellowship is a three-year interdisciplinary arrangement where I am in residence.  My obligations are relatively minor: we outlined a plan over a three year time horizon that involves offering a lecture or two every time I […]

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Why is this Girl Crying? Non-Price Competition, Part Deux

Back in March, I promised to elaborate on the notion that small generic colleges are often the worst prepared to consider non commodity features to focus upon.   That promise came after a simple review of how commodities generally work and how for the vast majority of non-selective universities, the demographics of the market just doesn’t […]

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The Shape of Things to Come

Critics used to deride the use of business terminology to speak about higher education.  Students were not “consumers” because higher education was not a “business.”  Twenty years ago, even a decade ago, the language of the market seemed anathema to many of us in academe.  Such language was akin to having moneychangers in the temple. […]

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Summer Reading: Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite

There is a lot to like and dislike in Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite & The Way to a Meaningful Life by William Deresiewicz.  The title pretty much sums it up.  What’s thoughtful is also trite and/or an overstatement. Deresiewicz, a former Yale prof who didn’t get tenure, looks on students at […]

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Sparking (Good) Debate

Much has been written about how academics have messed up via the internet.  Remember Dr. Steven Salaita who lost his job at the University of Illinois due to his “political expressions” about Israel?  Then there was Boston University’s Saida Grundy who tweeted “White masculinity isn’t a problem for America’s colleges, white masculinity is THE problem […]

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Disruptive Innovation: Prophetic Vision or Belabored Buzzword?

The rhetoric surrounding “disruptive innovation,” first theorized by Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen, has caused anxiety among many in higher education who worry that universities will soon join the ranks of Borders bookstores and the VHS.  According to Christensen, disruptive innovations are marked by four factors: 1) simplicity, 2) affordability, 3) convenience, and 4) the […]

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