Tag Archives: College Access

So, Please Vote for My Financial Aid App! Voting Ends Today (10/24)!

So, I have this app idea. It’s for a financial aid app that will help kids track their financial aid application process. It’s a really good idea and when I tell people about it, they say things like: “Wow, I want that for my kid/my nephew/ my cousin/myself!” or “You should figure out a way […]

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Games—A Matter of Life and Death?

Two weeks ago we were awarded a “First in the World” grant through the Fund for Innovation in Postsecondary Education. The program “provides grants to spur the development of innovations that improve educational outcomes, makes college more affordable for students and families, and develops an evidence base of effective practices.” When I listened to the […]

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California DREAM Loan Program

A few weeks back, California Governor Jerry Brown signed California Senate Bill 1210 (SB 1210) into law. SB 1210 establishes the California DREAM Loan Program for undocumented immigrant students attending the California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC). In short, undocumented immigrant students who qualify for reduced in-state academic fees (AB 540), […]

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Seven Weeks In and …

Part of my responsibilities here in the Pullias Center for Higher Education is overseeing the Increasing Access via Mentoring (I AM) Program—one of the center’s two outreach programs. I AM is an action-based intensive mentoring model where USC staff and graduate students guide Los Angeles area college-ready high school seniors through the college and financial aid […]

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Where Will I Send My High Achieving Latina Daughter to College?

First it’s important to note, this is not a humble brag blog entry, this is a post written out of serious worry about future educational opportunities, and not just for my kid of color. In California, if you are born after September 2, you have to attend “Transitional Kindergarten (TK)” and then begin regular Kindergarten […]

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Good Stuff x 2

During the 2014–2015 school year, I am very much looking forward to piloting wrap-around curriculum for the games we developed in collaboration with the USC Game Innovation Lab. The first up is FutureBound. FutureBound is a game designed to engage middle school students in learning about college. Through game play, students develop an understanding for […]

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Where’s Rieber Hall?

Late one night last fall, I ended up driving through the UCLA campus after the LA Metro Transportation Authority, Caltrans, and Kiewit decided to reroute me and other drivers off the 405 freeway for the one-millionth time in the last five years, but I digress. I attended UCLA as an undergrad and then worked as […]

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In Honor of William B. Michael—Can We Deconstruct a College Education Statistically?

It doesn’t seem right that another September is upon us and Bill Michael (William B. Michael) is not ambling slowly through Waite Phillips Hall, ready to at once terrorize and fascinate wary graduate students required to learn something about research methods and statistics. A giant in the field, Bill would constantly regale his nervous students […]

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The End of My Beginning …

Last Monday, I successfully defended my doctoral dissertation almost four years to the day that I started my Ph.D. program. It has been quite a ride. As I entered the room with the nationally known researchers, past university presidents, and research organization heads, I couldn’t help but feel honored to be there sharing about the […]

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Graduate Students in Debt & the Money Taboo

Last month I wrote a post about the newly released documentary, Ivory Tower. My post (and the film) was primarily concerning the student debt crisis facing higher education in general with a focus on the rise in student loan debt of undergraduate students in recent decades. But, what was not addressed in the film was […]

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