Tag Archives: California

Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

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Securing a Fall Admission Offer in the Middle of the Summer

Last month, I blogged about what to do if you are coming up short on money for the upcoming school year. I ended the blog explaining that a minority of students will have to accept the fact that maybe their plans of attending University X in the fall are not going to pan out. Here […]

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California No Longer a White Majority: What I Hope This Means For Education Research

According to the California Department of Finance, as of this month the Latino population will match the number of white non-Hispanics for the first time in California history. The department also projects that Latinos will become a majority in 2014, overtaking the white non-Hispanic population. And while population data is often utilized in education research, I would be […]

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Summer Financial Aid Problem Solving

Next week, SummerTIME—our annual four-week intensive writing and college knowledge summer program for 90 transitioning college freshmen—starts. Besides helping out with the writing curriculum and the program logistics, I’ll be reviewing financial aid offers with students and troubleshooting any issues. As in previous years, I anticipate the usual breakdown … 75% of students will have […]

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Foster Youth and College

Over 400,000 young people live in foster care in the United States. By the time a foster youth reaches high school, his likelihood of experiencing multiple residential placements is extremely high—most high school-aged foster youth have lived in over five placements. With each residential move, children are often required to change in schools as well. […]

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Have Ph.D. … Will Travel—Part II

Because newly-minted Ph.D. graduates far outweigh the number of tenure-track positions [read about the sobering statistics here], many will have to travel if they want a job in academia. From my own experiences with friends and colleagues, graduate students deal with the possibility in different ways. Some have families and friends and roots. Travel is […]

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The Thursday Pop: From the Mailbag

So here is a real e-mail that I received last week, I thought my response to it might be worth posting, so here it is. I’ve changed the name of the sender for privacy. Dr. Venegas: I am an English and AVID teacher at TW High School. I recently read your profile on the USC school […]

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What’s Race Got to Do with It?

As faculty members and co-directors of the Center for Urban Education (CUE) at the University of Southern California, we lead action research using CUE’s Equity Scorecard. The mission of our center is to create the “tools” needed for colleges and universities to bring about racial/ethnic equity in students’ collegiate experiences and outcomes. In the action […]

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Poverty and Impoverishment in the Bay Area of California

AERA’s 2013 theme is centered on the issue of “poverty.” It is spurred by President Bill Tierney’s provocation that despite education’s ability to lift students out of poverty, schooling is often mired in economic relations surrounded by the debilitating effects of poverty. There are at least two senses of “poverty” invoked here, to which I […]

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