Tag Archives: California

Thoughts on Building an Innovation State

Last week, Janet Napolitano, the current President of the University of California system, gave the annual Pullias Lecture at USC.  The transcript of her speech, entitled “A Trifecta for the Future: Higher Education, California, and Innovation,” can be found here.  Having never seen Napolitano speak in person before, I was immediately struck by her commanding […]

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In Reponse to Paul Krugman

Today I want to talk about power, or more specifically, the role of power in perpetuating and increasing inequality in the United States. I wasn’t planning on talking about this topic, well not so directly anyway. When I started this series of posts my intention was to limit my musings to the way we collectively […]

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Not Voting in a Time of Crisis

School Board elections are upon us here in Los Angeles. Elections will be held on March 3rd. There are seven Board seats, each representing a different part of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Four of the seven members are up for reelection. There are three contested seats. I know the incumbents who currently hold […]

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The Role of Laws and Policies in Maintaining the Status Quo

Today I turn my attention to federal and state laws and policies, particularly the ways in which they are implemented that inadvertently (or possibly intentionally) maintain the status quo. I am choosing to talk about law and policy and the implementation of law and policy because they are inextricably intertwined with each other. A law […]

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If I’m Not Teaching You, I Should Be Fired

Yesterday I said that I was going to spend four days talking about “the ways in which we (collectively) work harder to maintain the status quo than we do to change it.  I will discuss how our actions ultimately prevent us from reaching what we say are our goals.” I am going to spend today […]

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My Love for Public Education

I have been drawn to the field of education ever since high school.  When I was in 11th grade, I told my history teacher, Mrs. Nelson, that I wanted to become a history teacher. She told me she did not recommend I pursue this path. She said it was too much work, too hard, and […]

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Meet the “Mittelstand” and “Mitbestimmung”: Two Key Components to Germany’s Vocational Success

As I discussed last week, Germany’s model of apprenticeships and vocational education has attracted a considerable amount of media attention, especially in the United States.  Consequently, politicians are encouraging high schools and colleges to make their curricula more relevant to workforce demands.  In fact, one of the bullet points in President Obama’s American Graduation Initiative […]

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Linked Learning Tuesdays

This semester, I will be blogging on Tuesdays about a relatively new educational initiative entitled Linked Learning. In a nutshell, Linked Learning combines academic instruction with technical curricula to foster real-world skills and facilitate work-based learning. This integration, known as a “pathway,” is intended to be multidisciplinary, with collaboration between English, mathematics, science, social studies, […]

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I AM Mentoring Program Update

It’s November again and the college application season is in full swing. We (Carlos Galan, Michelle Cadena, and 50 volunteer mentors) have been helping 175 high school seniors apply to college. For California public universities (the University of California [UC] and the California State University [CSU]), the applications are due on Sunday, November 30. This […]

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Paying for College

Paying for College

Over the last several years we have rightfully been obsessing about student debt. Many students are taking on too much debt. The cost of college can also be a turnoff for poor students who understand debt but don’t necessarily understand foregone earnings. Why go to school for four years, incur debt, and end up with […]

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