Tag Archives: Book Review

I Read This and You Probably Should Too: The Entrepreneurial State

The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths by Mariana Mazzucato is not a sizzler that will keep you awake until you find out how it turns out. She’s an economist so the prose is workmanlike and the text can be excruciatingly dull—until you consider the ramifications of her argument. Remember Elizabeth Warren’s “you […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

I Read This Book and You Can If You Want To: “These Kids: Identity, Agency, and Social Justice at a Last Chance High School” by Kysa Nygreen

I approached this 217-page book with a fair amount of hope but finished it disappointed. Any book, especially an academic text, can be a disappointment and yet the text can be a learning experience. If I were to suggest that someone read this book I would probably recommend it for its flaws rather than its […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

I Read This Book and You Have To: It’s Complicated

It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by danah boyd is a fun, thoughtful, essential book to read for anyone who is trying to make sense of how teenagers make use of social media. Her narrative voice is great; from page 1 until the end of the book 213 pages later, the reader has […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

I Read This and You Don’t Need To: How Universities Work

John Lombardi has a long and distinguished career as a successful, argumentative university president at the University of Massachusetts, University of Florida, and Louisiana State. He has penned a short, incisive book, How Universities Work, that ultimately fails because he hasn’t answered the question every author must ask: Who will read this book? The small […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

I read Hope against hope: Three schools, one city, and the struggle to educate America’s children and you can too if you want

I was oddly unaffected by this book.  Normally I resonate to people’s stories struggling against all odds.  Sarah Carr’s 316 page narrative chronicles the challenges that primarily three individuals face in schools in post-Katrina New Orleans.  There is a 14 year old who we want to see succeed.  There is an ambitious idealistic TFA teacher […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Academic Affairs IV: A Sampling

Here’s an excerpt from William Tierney’s excellent Academic Affairs: A Love Story: Stanley opened his eyes and glanced at the clock. Only 6:00! He considered staying in bed a bit longer but he was wide awake. He told himself last night that he was dead tired because of all of the errands he had run, […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Academic Affairs III: Revelatory Reviews of the New Novel

Here’s what readers are saying: (1) With all the sizzle of Fifty Shades of Grey…Academic Affairs is not just a love story. It’s a true love story, as much about mind and spirit as it is about body. That is not to say this read is for prudes. We get to have our intellectual cake […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Academic Affairs II: An Interview with Bill

So what’s with a social scientist writing a novel? My whole career has been in part dedicated to representing reality, academic realities. Whether I’ve been doing ethnographies, case studies, interviews or observations, I have tried to portray situations as I have seen them, and in some cases lived and experienced them. This novel is another […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

Book Review: Paying for the Party: I read this book and you probably should as well

Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality, by Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton, is a five year study of young women at MU (aka Indiana University). The primary means of data collection was interviews with about 50 women over a five year time horizon. They thought they were writing a book about gender, but […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →

The Power and Peril of Free Speech

If we were going to list the world’s greatest living writers surely Salmon Rushdie would be on the list. I appreciate that he is not everyone’s cup of tea, but Midnight’s Children is regarded as a masterpiece; it not only won the prestigious Booker Prize, but was voted the “Booker of Bookers.” Some of his […]

Comments Off Continue Reading →