Tag Archives: AERA

How to Write a Book of the Year

Joyce King, President of AERA, asked me to fill a vacant position on one of the association’s many committees.  I can’t say no to Joyce, so I found myself on AERA’s “Book of the Year” committee.  I had never sat on the committee before so I didn’t know what I was in for until 56 […]

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People in Glass Houses: Rick Hess, AERA, and Rankings

Every year around this time Rick Hess writes a little screed in his outlet of choice – Ed Week – where he calls to task those individuals who come up with funny titles for presentations at AERA.  You can read his previous blogs here and here.  I’ve never been partial to ridicule, although its close […]

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Top 11 Things to Think About Approaching AERA’s Annual Meeting

There are two kinds of travelers – people who throw things into their suitcase at the last minute and rush to make the airplane, and others who start to lay out their clothes a few weeks before departure.  The former will have done little to no planning about what to see and do, and the […]

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Recognizing the Trajectory Toward Inequality

In his term as president of the American Education Research Association, Bill Tierney focused on inequity in education. Recently, he edited a volume with Johns Hopkins University Press, Rethinking Education and Poverty, that will help raise the awareness of researchers that focus on inequality in K-12 and higher education. After reviewing the draft chapters, I […]

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The Academic, Version 2.0: The Scholar in the Era of Social Media (#AERA14)

The Academic, Version 2.0: The Scholar in the Era of Social Media (#AERA14) Sun, April 6, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Convention Center, 100 Level, 108B Scholars have been late adopters of social media compared to professionals in other fields; however, our critical role in connecting with youth and across disciplines makes mastering social media an essential […]

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Approaching AERA

It’s that time of year again.  AERA is in our sights.  Last year we had 15,000 attendees in San Francisco so it’s like a small city.  I mentioned some of these points before, but they are worth repeating for those of us who are new to attending conferences in terms of how to plan. Be […]

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Rush to Relevance: Conducting Research to Improve Policy and Practice

“We need research to be more relevant” is a common clarion call in education. Most recently, John Easton, Director of IES, released a video for AERA in which he talks about different initiatives to improve relevancy. During one of my first Ph.D. courses, Bill asked us about the three major responsibilities of academics: research, teaching, […]

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Reflections on a Year: My Year as President of AERA Part IV

Kris Renn, my program chair, and I put together presidential and invited sessions based on a variety of factors, but a key point had to do with ensuring there was a diversity of opinion. Secretary of Education Duncan garnered the most controversy. Several individuals said I should not have invited him to speak or I […]

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Reflections on a Year: My year as President of AERA Part II

As so often happens, one of the more time-consuming and contentious issues during the year was something I had no knowledge about until a week or two after I became president. The merger of AERJ from two sections to one was a hot-button issue for some members of the association. One of the problems about […]

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Reflections on a Year: My Year as President of AERA Part I

Reflections on a Year: My Year as President of AERA Part I

I thought it might be useful to reflect on what I learned during the year of my presidency at AERA for a few blogs. Not surprisingly, I suppose, either for those who know research associations or me, the year was a learning experience. I also was not surprised by some of the more contentious situations […]

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