Tag Archives: Academe

Research Focusing of Promoting Equity

With the reversal, starting in the late 1970s, of this nation’s century-long trajectory toward economic and educational fairness, we need to rethink how to promote fairness and social justice. Given the pervasive use of market mechanisms in higher education and urban schools, this is especially urgent. In particular, the notion that there are pipelines to […]

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Globalization and Social Justice

The phrase “globalization and social justice” can be viewed as an oxymoron or a goal, but it certainly is not a true statement of interrelated facts. Over time there has been a correlation between the engagement of nations in the global economy and growth in income inequality within those nations. Thomas Piketty, Joseph Stiglitz, and […]

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Rethinking the Foundations of Higher Education

The Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) has played a substantial role in developing content in the field through the publication of ASHE readers. These texts essentially reproduce noteworthy articles, papers, and chapters as textbooks that can be used in core courses. Advancing Higher Education as a Field of Study (edited by Sydney […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the post-secondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence. This would likely involve fewer tenure track faculty. The bloom […]

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What’s in a Name?

Professor? Dr.? Bill? Since the first day of my Ph.D. program I consistently called all of my instructors Dr. So and So. This was against the norm of most students; students called the faculty members by their first names both to their face and behind closed doors. Along the way I have received some pushback […]

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Quality Conversations in Academe

The blog topics this week begin a conversation about what we mean when we talk about “quality” as faculty in the higher education environment. I have asked four colleagues to each take a particular topic and start us off. Tomorrow, Jen Crawford writes about quality peer feedback on faculty teaching. On Wednesday, Kim Ferrario writes […]

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P.S. Clayton Kershaw and Sportsmanship/Academic Citizenship

Clayton Kershaw is one of the best pitchers in baseball, regardless of his performance in October. He, too, plays for “your Los Angeles Dodgers.” Since my previous blog was about sports and athleticism, let me add a few thoughts about the sort of role model Kershaw is and what it’s made me think about with […]

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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Moving to Full Professor III

We all love lists. We also like transparency. “I don’t know what to do” certainly sounds like a downer. Advice (if it’s correct!) also can be very helpful. But honestly, the last two blogs (located here and here) were a downer for me. I never thought of academic life as a checklist. I never went […]

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