Tag Archives: Academe

P.S. Clayton Kershaw and Sportsmanship/Academic Citizenship

Clayton Kershaw is one of the best pitchers in baseball, regardless of his performance in October. He, too, plays for “your Los Angeles Dodgers.” Since my previous blog was about sports and athleticism, let me add a few thoughts about the sort of role model Kershaw is and what it’s made me think about with […]

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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Moving to Full Professor III

We all love lists. We also like transparency. “I don’t know what to do” certainly sounds like a downer. Advice (if it’s correct!) also can be very helpful. But honestly, the last two blogs (located here and here) were a downer for me. I never thought of academic life as a checklist. I never went […]

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Moving to Full Professor II

What’s missing from the list I presented? Editing. I wrote about editing in a previous blog. Editing is something I have enjoyed but does not earn very many direct plaudits. There are also tiers of editing. Editing a university press book is more important than editing something from a third-tier press. Training grants and such. […]

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Moving to Full Professor I

People have asked me what it takes to move from associate to full professor. One of the problems in giving advice is that once something is written down it becomes a “rule.” Caveat emptor! These are not rules. They are opinions and thoughts that have gone, and continue to go, through reformulation. I want to […]

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My First Year in a Ph.D. Program in Three Stanzas

“Geometry,” a poem by Rita Dove, describes much of my experience as a first year Ph.D. student in urban education policy. I prove a theorem and the house expands: the windows jerk free to hover near the ceiling, the ceiling floats away with a sigh. As the walls clear themselves of everything but transparency, the […]

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When What You Read Is What You Live

I have noticed that with some academics, a particular book, article, report, or other piece of scholarship marks somewhat of a turning point, which changes the course of their thinking or approach. For me, this piece was Shirely Hune’s “Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education: Claiming Visibility & Voice.” I don’t remember how I […]

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10 things I wish all professors knew

I got my PhD in 1984.  During that time I’ve done research on students, faculty, and administrators.  I’ve seen different individuals and groups as ‘research subjects’ as students, colleagues, and as friends.  I’ve developed some thoughts I’d like to share based on my research, my observations, and common sense.  By no means is this everything […]

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Academic Affairs III: Revelatory Reviews of the New Novel

Here’s what readers are saying: (1) With all the sizzle of Fifty Shades of Grey…Academic Affairs is not just a love story. It’s a true love story, as much about mind and spirit as it is about body. That is not to say this read is for prudes. We get to have our intellectual cake […]

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