Tag Archives: Academe

Academic Affairs III: Revelatory Reviews of the New Novel

Here’s what readers are saying: (1) With all the sizzle of Fifty Shades of Grey…Academic Affairs is not just a love story. It’s a true love story, as much about mind and spirit as it is about body. That is not to say this read is for prudes. We get to have our intellectual cake […]

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Late Career Transitions

Throughout academic life, from the decision to prepare for college as a high school student, through the decision to move toward retirement as a professor or other professional, we need to balance our family life with our own goals and aspirations. For underrepresented college students, encouragement from family and community members to pursue a college […]

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Life of the Questioning Mind

How intriguing it was to be invited by Bill Tierney and Ed St. John to reflect on my life in academe as a professor. Throughout my life and varied careers, I have continued to ask “why.” Life of the Questioning Mind meant a dedication to asking why such and such was so throughout my life—and […]

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What is It Like to Have Been an Academic?

When I finished graduate school I had an interest in doing research, but was not sure I wanted to be a full-time professor. To be honest, my grades were not the highest and I was not considered the hottest prospect to come out of my program in industrial psychology at Kansas State, although I came […]

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What Is It Like to Have Been an Academic?

This was the question Bill Tierney handed me in for this week of blogs. He indicated: “It might be useful to have some senior folks reflect on what Academe was, what it meant to you, how it’s changed for you, etc.”  So this blog starts a week of reflections by senior scholars. While I finished […]

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On Rejection

Kurt Vonnegut once said to a group of eager writing students, “Probably all of you are good enough to make it as writers. But it’s likely that only one of you has what it takes to endure the constant rejection.” I’m not sure I would reduce academic life to such a straightforward statement, but he’s […]

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Reflections on Racial Profiling at USC

As I approached this May 7 blog post I was all set to write about AERA 2013, a phenomenal career-changing experience. I left San Francisco feeling refreshed in my purpose as an emerging scholar in the field of postsecondary education. But shortly after I returned home I was reminded by another unfortunate incident of my […]

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Have Ph.D. … Will Travel—Part 1

As May approaches, Ph.D. candidates are scrambling to submit dissertation chapters to their committee chairs. At the same time, many have heard or are eagerly waiting to hear from search committees regarding potential jobs. Some even have job offers. During a hectic time, the negotiation process only adds to the hubbub. Here’s some advice: Take […]

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Imagining a More Action-Oriented Tenure Process

On the first day of school, two students started fighting. One student tried to escape. The two ran from the first to third floor. A crowd followed them. Just before the fight stopped, a security guard’s head slammed through a window in my classroom’s door. She never returned to school. A few days later, someone […]

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Looking Back, While Moving Forward

The truth is, the spaces and occupations we belong to can hurt us. Such a notion is no stranger to any profession, much less to anyone working in academe. Yet I wonder why pain and healing seem to be almost taboo topics in this arena. Perhaps because the nature of our work is almost machine-like, […]

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