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Human History in 140 Characters or Less

By June Ahn

The Library of Congress acquires Twitter archives.

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Hull House, Benny Goodman, and Social Movements

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens The history of education reform is the history of trends. Movements come and go and then come back again, oftentimes refashioned with new rhetoric or different twists. Community-based reforms, which are becoming increasingly popular, are no different. The recurrence of social movements in this instance, however, may be beneficial. Jane Addams and […]

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A Dummies Guide to AERA: A Second-year Student’s Perspective

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Following Bill’s lead, I am going to talk about AERA. Last year I wrote The Dummies Guide to AERA: A First-Year’s Experiences Revisited. A bit disgruntled by a chorus of antipathy–professors and graduate students alike bemoaned the conference–I recounted my own experiences.  Overall, I enjoyed my time in San Diego and believed in […]

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A Survival Guide to Navigating AERA

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney AERA is right around the corner.  The Association has about 25,000 members and roughly half of them show up for the conference.  People love to hate AERA.  My conservative friends like to disdain all the “Marxist nonsense,” all the ‘problematizing’ this or that and the various standpoints that different individuals assume.  My […]

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Words Matter

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Words are funny things. Alone they don’t accomplish much. However, the right combinations can change the world. Consider one pronoun, one verb, one article, and one noun: I have a dream. Alone the words mean little; together they inspire a nation. Or, think about one verb and two pronouns: I love you. […]

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Knowing

By Stefani Relles

“I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.” – Leonardo da Vinci

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21st Century Scholar Book Awards

By Bill Tierney

I have a double worry and I want to do something about it.  First, journals publish book reviews so darn slowly that frequently a book that got published in 2007 finally may get reviewed in 2010.  Second, awards have become something of a racket.  I’ve written about both of these issues in the past. I […]

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When is it alright to change your mind?

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Between her new book and op-ed piece, Diane Ravitch has intentionally or unintentionally done plenty of rabble-rousing within the last month. Once a proponent of school choice and accountability, she has recently reconsidered. The change is no small thing in regard to her influence. She has published many books and worked as a scholar […]

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It’s Academic: Name-calling in the Public Square

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Over the last year or two I have gotten more involved in discussions about academe in the public square. I’ve always talked with reporters about a topic, but now I’m doing various radio interviews, op-eds, and even an on-camera piece. I’m learning the tricks of the trade as I go along, and […]

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Part V: Higher education and the state of minority-serving institutions

By Stefani Relles

Guest scholar, James T. Minor presents his fifth post authored with graduate student, Jamila Lee-Johnson. Today’s post wraps up a 5-part blog series on higher education and minority-serving institutions such as historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). About the authors: Dr. James T. Minor is an assistant professor of higher education in the Department of […]

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