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The excitement and potential of a new school year

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Last week, I flew home for a short break before the hustle and bustle of the fall semester and my third year begins. To escape the D.C. heat and humidity, I spent a lot of time swimming with my niece and nephews. In between hurling them across the pool–to their mother and […]

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We’re Back!

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney We’re Back! The summer should be a time for respite and reflection, and I had some of that, but we also were extremely busy.  Our writing program, SummerTime, successfully concluded its 9th summer.   Gib Hentschke and I are also doing a project on privatization that has consumed more time than we envisioned […]

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Summer hiatus

By Stefani Relles

21st Century Scholar will be on break until Monday, August 23rd. We look forward to picking up where we left off then. In the meantime, enjoy the summer.

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Thursday is TechDay

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles In a previous post, I introduced Ning and the easy access this (once free) platform gives to educators and researchers who want to create (and study) a self-contained digital ecosystem for student _________________. Building the Ning social network is easy, but using it to teach is hard because technology doesn’t teach _________________ […]

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On Leadership: Part II

By Bill Tierney

By Bill Tierney I mentioned previously that Steve Sample is stepping down as president of USC in August.  Our current provost, Max Nikias, will become president. One of the interesting aspects of a private university is the difference between culture and laws.  Laws regulate from the outside in:  we do something because the law says […]

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Duncan highlights the need for parent involvement

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently said he wanted to require “parent and community input” in the reauthorization of Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Afterwards, National Journal’s Education Experts, a blog featuring an array of education professionals, posed the question “Can Communities and Parents Help Turn Around Schools?” The prompt elicited a […]

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On Leadership: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Quick quiz.  Who said this: Courage! What makes a king out of a slave?  Courage!  What makes the mast on the flag to wave?  Courage!  What makes the elephant charge his tusk in the misty mist, or the dusky dusk?  What makes the muskrat guard his musk?  Courage!  What makes the Hottentot […]

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Pathfinder update

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin I am happy to announce that the Pathfinder project has been awarded a $103,281 grant from the TG Foundation to conduct a study entitled “Increasing College Access through Digital Technologies.”  CHEPA is partnering with Dr. Gisele Ragusa from Rossier’s Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) on this project.  We will begin […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part III

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Assume the opposite of the situation I actually have at USC.  Assume I am deeply disappointed in my university president.  I send emails to my trusted colleagues and suggest that we put forward a vote of no confidence in the president.  I offer as evidence a variety of issues where I feel […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Assume our usual email address is the university’s server.  I get, roughly, 50 email messages a day and another 20 that are purely junk.  I work at a private university, and like the mailbox where I receive paper correspondence, I always have assumed that the university has the right to circumscribe what […]

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