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Thursday is TechDay: The Mozart conundrum

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles A post last year on fastcompany.com proclaimed that educational technology would give seminal economists, William J. Baumol and William G. Bowen, a run for their money. Why? It was Baumol and Bowen’s contention that technological innovations which increase productivity in other labor sectors have no bearing in academe. In their 1966 study, […]

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Academic Freedom and Jerks

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Academic Freedom and Jerks We frequently like to think of academic freedom by the following example: a noble professor has his or her rights infringed upon, the crowd stands up for the victim, and ultimately right wins out. Such cases are replete in our history. We also have examples, however, when repugnant […]

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Taking down the ivory towers: A new role for universities

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Michael Burawoy is an acclaimed sociologist at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the former president of the American Sociological Association. During his presidential address, he spoke of public sociology, an approach that embraces the use of data and theory to not only explain but also improve society. A public […]

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Three Meals A Day

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin “When I had to submit my deposit for college, I didn’t have the money.  There was this deadline, and I didn’t have the money.  I had no one to turn to, no one….I had nowhere to go.”  The audience at yesterday’s New Visions Foundation’s “Overcoming College Obstacles for Foster Youth” conference went […]

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Thursday is TechDay: The nerdness continuum

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Being digitally literate is more than just the knowledge and ability to use a computer. It’s being able to create information using technology. Some suggest it’s an indicator of the comfort level with which one uses digital platforms effectively. Ten years ago, just knowing how to send an email signified technical ability. […]

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Travels in Turkey: Part V by Bill Tierney

By Bill Tierney

The last installment in our Travels in Turkey series follows. Turkey and Travel by Bill Tierney Although I have mostly resisted writing about anything other than issues related to higher education on this blog, enough people have asked me about traveling in Turkey that I thought I would give a thumbnail sketch of what to […]

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The promise (and peril) of Promise Neighborhoods

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Geoff Canada has quickly become a popular example of the charismatic, transformational leader necessary for positive educational change. His vision of the potential of one neighborhood is nonpareil and extraordinary. His non-profit organization, the Harlem’s Children Zone, which provides a comprehensive suite of services to children and families within a 100 city block […]

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Travels in Turkey: Part IV by Bill Tierney

By Bill Tierney

21st Century Scholar’s own Dr. William G. Tierney recently returned from a month in Turkey. He blogs about his travel experience in this fourth installment of the series, aptly entitled, Travels in Turkey. Turkey and Jobs by Bill Tierney A friend who lives here commented to me one day that “Turkey is a can-do country.  […]

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Purple Rain

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin Last Thursday night was a surreal evening in LA.  While the world watched the Lakers win their second NBA title in a row, blogmaster Stefani Relles and I watched the students we have mentored over the past year graduate from high school.  We were less than two miles away from the Staples […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Convergence is the mantra

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Historic changes in technology and the rapid growth in digital media and online communications are impacting nearly every aspect of our personal and professional lives (and arguably helping merge the two). Convergence is the mantra. If you haven’t seen “Did You Know,” it’s worth the five minutes of your time. The original […]

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