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Higher Education and Social Media

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Last year, Bill and I tried using Twitter in our graduate-level class. It failed miserably. Only a few students tweeted and the others thought it was a chore to re-route their online traffic patterns. Halfway through the semester, we returned to full-time email use. What’s the lesson? We tried and we learned. […]

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On Leadership

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Leadership is frequently in short supply in higher education. Presidents have turned into fundraisers, and provosts are frequently managers. Faculty leaders are all too often shop stewards who are very good at looking out for their folks, but not anyone else. We are also in such a litigious society that the general […]

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First Friday With Mark DeFusco

By Mark DeFusco

by Mark DeFusco, Ph.D. To Be or Not to Be – For Profit or Not For Profit? That is the Question. With apologies to the Bard, this month’s First Friday Commentary examines the recent trend of For-Profit colleges to consider an alternate form of ownership. In case you haven’t been watching, Congress (the Harkin HELP […]

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The Thursday Pop by Kristan Venegas

By Kristan Venegas

RuPaul’s Drag Race & Teen Mom II: What can they tell us about access to higher education? Two of my favorite television programs this season are RuPaul’s Drag Race and Teen Mom II. Maybe you don’t watch reality TV, but I do and I learn a lot from it. I’ve heard arguments that these shows […]

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On Interviewing

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I served on the search committee for the Provost this past fall.  One might think that the search for a provost is a very different undertaking than searching for an assistant professor, but that’s not the case.  Sure, there are some differences.  We used a search firm; confidentiality was crucial; the president […]

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(Re)viewing the Classics: Carol Stack’s All Our Kin

(Re)viewing the Classics: Carol Stack’s All Our Kin

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Carol Stack, with her three-year-old son in tow, spent several years collecting data in The Flats, a poor, black neighborhood in an unidentified Midwestern city. Her purpose was to examine the strategies poor people adopt in order to survive. The researcher, now a faculty member at University of California, Berkeley, did not seek access through […]

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Academics on the Inside Job

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney “Inside Job” is a well-done documentary about the collapse of the financial industry.  The movie is akin to Al Gore’s “Inconvenient Truth” in tone and style.  The movie is very serious and has little of the fun of a Michael Moore flick.  But the director and writers make a very difficult topic […]

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The Capacity Crisis in California

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney College Enrollment in California Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2010 The California Postsecondary Education Commission estimates that by 2019 over 385,000 additional individuals will be interested in enrolling as undergraduates in a public postsecondary institution, with total enrollment projections rising as high as 2.75 million students.  These numbers are sobering when […]

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Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Aca-Fan

By Stefani Relles

By Stefani Relles Two weeks ago, I announced the “Thursday is TechDay” objective of developing an active 21st Century Scholar blogroll. This week, I spool out the first blogger on our register. As a reminder, a blogroll is a list of other blogs that a blogger (or collaborative blog such as 21st Century Scholar) recommends […]

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College for All

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney In 1841 Horace Mann wrote that “education has a power of ministering to our personal and material wants beyond all other agencies.  Every wise parent and community, desiring the prosperity of their children, will spare no pains in giving them a generous education.”   Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century Americans were in […]

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