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Toward a Public Scholarship

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens “The issue now is not simply to promote ourselves better,” writes Craig Calhoun, an acclaimed sociologist and president of the Social Science Research Council, “but to ask better social science questions about what encourages scientific innovation, what makes knowledge useful, and how to pursue both these agendas, with attention to both immediate […]

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Helping Higher Education Get Its Groove Back: Part IV

By Bill Tierney

Make believe that we don’t have a higher education system in this country, but that we have just decided that we should create one.  Do you think we’d create the crazy patchwork quilt that we’ve got today?  I hope not.  Here are some topics I’d like us to consider. Mastery of knowledge Let’s eliminate ‘terms’ […]

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Helping Higher Education Get Its Groove Back: Part III

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Quick quiz #1:  Name the three best football coaches in America. Remember, Pete Carroll, has decamped for Seattle. Quick quiz #2:  Name the three best college presidents in America. Therein lies the problem.  I’m betting that even readers of this blog, ostensibly individuals who have some interest in education, will find an easier […]

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The Importance of Good Teachers

By June Ahn

How does teacher quality matter? Findings from a recent study of twins.

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Helping Higher Education Get Its Groove Back: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I have a young friend who I’ve mentored over the years and he is about to graduate from Stanford with a Master’s degree in Engineering.  His GPA for his bachelor’s was 3.96.  We talk a lot about education and he sheepishly told me at Christmas that he had not gone to his […]

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Game on!

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin The Pathfinder card decks have arrived.  They are very cool.  Inside the sleek blue and orange boxes are mock application envelopes, directions and 2 stacks of brightly colored cards that guide the game. A quote from Obama adorns one side of the box: “We need to put a college education within reach […]

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The Facebook Dilemma: To Friend or Not to Friend

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens It’s clear that social media can facilitate student-teacher interactions. The appeal is immense; learning becomes boundless. Yet, student-teacher friending also introduces multiple issues, including access and inappropriate interactions. I did not use Facebook when I was a teacher. I knew several teachers who did, and they also friended students. Our school had […]

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Helping Higher Education Get Its Groove Back: Part I *

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I recall my advisor in graduate school fondly recalling the 1960s as being on easy street.  I was his grad student in the 80s and he had just completed a book about retrenchment.  “Back in the 60s,” he said nostalgically, “it was almost like, ‘while you’re up, could you get me a […]

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Human History in 140 Characters or Less

By June Ahn

The Library of Congress acquires Twitter archives.

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Hull House, Benny Goodman, and Social Movements

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens The history of education reform is the history of trends. Movements come and go and then come back again, oftentimes refashioned with new rhetoric or different twists. Community-based reforms, which are becoming increasingly popular, are no different. The recurrence of social movements in this instance, however, may be beneficial. Jane Addams and […]

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