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Snapshots of injustice: Using data to tell a story

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens During a recent meeting, Bill and I discussed different ways to present data. Being a skilled and socially responsible researcher is not simply about designing and executing an elegant study. Presentation matters. The reasons are multiple: Researchers now need to search for funding; asking for money from a foundation includes a level […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Bob O’Neil has written a nice book, Academic Freedom in the Wired World: Political Extremism, Corporate Power, and the University, which I’m not going to review, but I’d like to pass along some thoughts the book gave me about technology and academic freedom, Most of us use university servers for our email […]

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As libraries go virtual

By Zoe B. Corwin

During my freshman year at UCLA I remember phoning my parents from the library. (There must have been a phone booth tucked away on one of the floors.  Remember those?)  I had been finding books for a research project and felt excited and important and connected to a legacy of students and scholars before me.  […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Ninging

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Over the last several posts, I’ve been approaching the subject of technology and education rather conceptually. Briefly, I’ve discussed the basic tenets of Web 2.0 applications and services. It all boils down to a widespread shift in the way we think about, develop and ultimately use technology. Uploading is so 2004. Today’s […]

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On Writing and Athletics

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney The final concert of the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s season was John Adam’s new piece, City Noir, and Mahler’s Symphony #1 with Gustavo Dudamel conducting – fantastic!  Before the concert they had an interview with John Adams.  He is probably best known for Dr. Atomic and Nixon in China, and some describe his […]

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The social construction of change: Why deliberation matters

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Collaboration and stakeholder involvement are catchphrases frequently bandied about during policy design. The words connote democracy and shared decision-making. True deliberation, unfortunately, rarely occurs. Instead, we are entrenched in an age of symbolic rhetoric, not authentic participation, when talk about participation far exceeds actual involvement. Never more has the inclusion of varied […]

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The Ask: A novel by Sam Lipsyte

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I never thought much about fund-raising in graduate school or as an assistant professor.  Although Bryce Jordan at Penn State embarked on the first ever capital campaign for the university, we all thought fund-raising was something that administrators did, not faculty.  I watched from a disinterested distance as he blew through his […]

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Sustaining and Disrupting

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Henry Ford is supposed to have said, “If I asked my customers what they wanted, they’d have said a faster horse.”  Even if he didn’t say it, the statement gets to the heart of what Clayton Christensen has said about sustainable technology and disruptive technology.  When we moved from a manual typewriter […]

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Thursday is TechDay: The Mozart conundrum

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles A post last year on fastcompany.com proclaimed that educational technology would give seminal economists, William J. Baumol and William G. Bowen, a run for their money. Why? It was Baumol and Bowen’s contention that technological innovations which increase productivity in other labor sectors have no bearing in academe. In their 1966 study, […]

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Academic Freedom and Jerks

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Academic Freedom and Jerks We frequently like to think of academic freedom by the following example: a noble professor has his or her rights infringed upon, the crowd stands up for the victim, and ultimately right wins out. Such cases are replete in our history. We also have examples, however, when repugnant […]

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