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Retirement Planning and Pension Reform 101

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney A great many decisions for me at base are philosophical statements about how we think we should live our lives.  Social security to me is a belief that we are all connected and that in our later years we should enable individuals to receive some economic benefit so they are not reduced […]

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Blog by Numbers: College Graduation Rates

By Stefani Relles

We continue our Blog by Numbers series where we let the statistics do the talking. This one chart shows graduate rates for the UC and CSU.  There are many reasons why so few students graduate in 4 years. But at a time when many are saying students should graduate in less than 4 years, what does […]

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Human subjects and righteous dopefiends

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Philippe Bourgois wrote In Search of Respect over a decade ago and I have used it repeatedly in my classes and in my writing.  His latest book, Righteous Dopefiend, written with Jeff Schonberg, is a fitting follow-up.  They spent ten years with a group of homeless people addicted to heroin.  The book […]

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Sell the team, Frank

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I commented in an earlier blog that I’d prefer to keep these posts related to higher education.   So what I’m going to say here is a stretch, but give me some leeway. I love baseball.  I grew up following the Dodgers and hating the Yankees.  When I went to Boston to study […]

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Trick or treat? Teachers and professional development at the haunted schoolhouse of horrors

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens My sisters and I used to trick or treat, collecting our candy in sleeping bags. A successful Halloween night ended with tired legs and a mound of sugary confections to sort through. A good bounty included quality stuff like full-sized candy bars and hand-fulls of Sweetarts. Pennies, candy corn, tootsie rolls, and […]

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The decline of the culture of teaching: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Call me crazy, but I have long enjoyed reading the writing of students.   Every now and then someone puts together a nifty sentence, paragraph or paper, and I still get a rush of excitement at his or her accomplishment.  I also enjoy watching someone’s work improve over time. I always have offered […]

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Pathfinder’s Progress

By Zoe B. Corwin

As the 2010/2011 school year unfolds, CHEPA’s Pathfinder project continues to evolve. In exciting news, the design team from USC’s Game Innovation Lab has just released the initial digital storyboards for the Facebook Application of the game.  After playtesting the card game with over 300 students and practitioners, seeing the digital mock-up for the first time was […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Which Web Browser Do You Wear?

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Choosing a web browser is like buying a pair of shoes. You’re going to do a lot of walking, but you may have different priorities for what you like to wear on your feet than other people. Some of us are no-nonsense, and want plain comfort over style. Others of us like […]

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The decline of the culture of teaching: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I have been fortunate to have had excellent teachers throughout my entire education.  I was thinking recently how many of those teachers taught me lessons outside of class.  Mr. Taylor was my American history teacher in high school and I worked for him in the summers (two bucks an hour!) doing odd […]

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The problem with education jargon

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Language is a contradiction. It both liberates and constrains. Consider a toddler learning English. Her understanding of and command over the world expands as she learns words like food, mom, and dog. Similarly, an art student’s perception of space changes as he learns about concepts such as line and plane. But, language […]

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