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Bill Tierney and Stefani Relles blog at The Washington Post

By Lisa Garcia

Want to read more about how to teach writing to college-bound students? Check out the blog post here!

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Writing books about higher education

By Bill Tierney

About 90% of books published about higher education every year are dull, repetitive, or armchair treatises that have little of interest to say about the current state of academic affairs. –Benjamin Ginsberg. The famous sportswriter, Howard Cosell, once wrote an important book entitled I Never Played the Game. When Cosell was in his prime he […]

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Adaptive strategies and underground economies in the 21st century

By Randy Clemens

I. In 1974, Carol Stack published All Our Kin: Strategies for Survival in a Black Community. The groundbreaking ethnography chronicled the adaptive strategies of poor African American families. Stack provided thick descriptions of women struggling to raise their children. In doing so, she indicted poverty as pathology and inadequate public policies. Since then, ethnographers have […]

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The importance of mentoring: Just call me coach

By Bill Tierney

The lack of academic coaching highlights how little regard the academy has for mentoring scholars. Assume you’re an assistant professor in your second year and you’re worried. You only have published one paper, another you have resubmitted, and three others have just been rejected. You also submitted a proposal for funding and they didn’t even […]

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Meaningful assessment and evaluation in challenging circumstances and contexts

By Gisele Ragusa

The blog entries for this week provide both an overview of impact focused educational assessment and evaluation and discuss both historical and emergent dilemmas in assessment and evaluation for students in K–12, college goers, and teachers. Identifying these dilemmas do not let us off the hook for addressing these important issues. This is of particular […]

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Evaluating pediatricians and educational practitioners: An immodest proposal

By Gisele Ragusa

A significant disparity exists between the way our nation evaluates teachers and the way the nation evaluates physicians. Teacher evaluations are unique to the profession and research has indicated that the evaluations may place teachers at an unfair disadvantage (Pecheone & Chung, 2006). As an example of this potential disadvantage, applied to pediatrics, teachers are […]

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Stereotype threat applied to testing, assessment, and evaluation

By Gisele Ragusa

In particular to testing biases, several studies explore a myriad of ways that “negative stereotype threat” affects students’ test performance (Aronson, & Salinas, 1997; Osborne, 2005; Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999; Steele & Aronson, 1995). Levels of stress and anxiety increase when faced with the prospect that a low test score will confirm negative stereotypes […]

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Assessment biases in K–12 and universities: Testing-challenges and limits

By Gisele Ragusa

Low-income and minority K–12 students face a veritable gauntlet of obstacles in the college admissions process. This is of particular significance when consideration is given to student performance evaluation. Aptitude tests including the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), which purports to determine a student’s potential for academic success in college, are some of the most formidable […]

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An overview of evaluation in education: Essential elements; critical and common components

By Gisele Ragusa

Evaluation and assessment in education have become “hot topics” in grades Kindergarten through 12 (K–12) and higher education. Gone is the day where individuals or groups can propose an intervention or remediation to alleviate an educational challenge to a funding source for support of a project without including a significant impact-focused evaluation with assessment embedded. […]

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Special week … evaluation in education

By Lisa Garcia

This week’s 21st Century Scholar blog posts focus on educational evaluation and assessment. The posts are written by the University of Southern California’s (USC) Center for Outcomes research and Evaluation (CORE) research team. USC’s CORE center is a federally-funded research unit with foci on impact-focused outcomes research, all of which has evaluative components. The CORE […]

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