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Summer Reading

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of the great aspects of ‘SC is that we wrap up spring semester by mid-May. The summer stretches out seemingly forever and all those books I have on my shelf or on my Kindle I finally think I will be able to read. But, I can’t read everything, so here are […]

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Sample size isn’t everything

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens I’m nearing the end of the written portion of my qualifying exam (thankfully), and I’ve been thinking a lot about a lot. In particular, I keep returning to a similar theme: Academics have short memories. Consider, for instance, the sad story of life history: Less than a century ago, life histories were […]

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How to Work in the Summer

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Summers are a time of opportunity, but often they end up being lost opportunity. Years ago a psychologist, Bob Boice, did a ton of research about how to increase productivity of early-career faculty. One of his findings was that individuals tended to put off until the summer to write something “big” —the […]

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First Friday with Mark DeFusco

By Mark DeFusco

Why Does College Cost So Much? by Mark DeFusco, Ph.D. Last month, I addressed the fact that in many cases, states were contributing a paltry amount of help to their higher education systems. The notion that the Governor of Pennsylvania is proposing to slash nearly 50% of the state’s contribution to Penn State—from 8% of […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Distributing Cognition

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Today’s Thursday is TechDay is a look at the future in distributed cognition. We hear from all sources of media that communication technologies are evolving at an astonishing rate. What lies around the bend may make you laugh or perhaps roll your eyes. It debuted at TED in 2009 and it falls […]

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The Kids Are Alright

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney On television, Glee is all the rage now, consistently scoring in the top 20 of shows that people of all ages watch.  I like Glee.  How can you not like a bunch of kids singing showtunes?  It’s a latter-day Mickey Rooney/Shirley Temple “let’s put on a show!” kind of TV that is […]

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Why can’t researchers be superintendents?

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens I am not so egotistical to think, if given the opportunity tomorrow, I should run a school district. I have three years of teaching experience, one year of administrative experience, and three years of research experience. In short, I am young and inexperienced. Bill Tierney, on the other hand, is old(er) and […]

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Guest Blogger Yvonna S. Lincoln on Waiting for Superman

By Yvonna Lincoln

Yvonna S. Lincoln is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education and Program Chair of the Higher Education Administration Program at Texas A&M University. “Waiting for Superman” is a documentary about contradictions.  The title comes from a young boy’s dream that Superman will someday come, and somehow eliminate poverty, substandard housing, and bad schools.  But of course, Superman […]

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Guest blogger Lauren Anderson on Waiting for Superman

By Lorraine Solaegui

Lauren Anderson is an Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on teacher education policy and practice. She currently teaches masters and doctoral students in the MAT program and TEMS concentration. Having finally watched WFS, I find myself compelled, disturbed and perturbed. How could it not be compelling? Beautiful […]

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WFS…beyond the Ivory Tower

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin 21st Century Scholar readers spend time thinking about education.  Chances are, many of our readers  have even spent time in underperforming schools – perhaps conducting research or implementing reforms.  Maybe blogging about educational conundrums or writing about remedying public education?   I’m in that group.  I’m also a mom and spend quite a […]

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