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Thursday is TechDay: Which Web Browser Do You Wear?

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Choosing a web browser is like buying a pair of shoes. You’re going to do a lot of walking, but you may have different priorities for what you like to wear on your feet than other people. Some of us are no-nonsense, and want plain comfort over style. Others of us like […]

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The decline of the culture of teaching: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I have been fortunate to have had excellent teachers throughout my entire education.  I was thinking recently how many of those teachers taught me lessons outside of class.  Mr. Taylor was my American history teacher in high school and I worked for him in the summers (two bucks an hour!) doing odd […]

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The problem with education jargon

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Language is a contradiction. It both liberates and constrains. Consider a toddler learning English. Her understanding of and command over the world expands as she learns words like food, mom, and dog. Similarly, an art student’s perception of space changes as he learns about concepts such as line and plane. But, language […]

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On Driving Lessons and Hamlet’s Blackberry

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of the students I mentor asked me over the summer to teach him how to drive.  Now anyone who has seen me drive will find the request odd, not unlike someone asking George Bush for grammar lessons, but I accepted my mentee’s request. Before I started the lesson I asked my […]

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Blog by Numbers: Dropout Rates

By Stefani Relles

This August, we decided to let the numbers blog/speak for themselves on certain Thursdays and Fridays. Tables and charts can be very useful; they also can deceive or be contradictory depending upon how the information is presented. Today’s tables demonstrate dropout rates in Los Angeles and in the State.  Note how different the rates are.  The […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Ode to Battery Life

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Today’s tech users want mobility (laptop computers have been outselling desktop PCs since 2006). But laptops need power and the electrical outlets in classrooms, conference rooms and coffee shops are often outnumbered by computer users. Even if the outlet’s free, what if the cord doesn’t reach? Don’t leave yourself vulnerable to a […]

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Running Barefoot and On-line Learning

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of the more pleasurable books I have read over the last few months is Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall. The book is a non-fiction story about a race that takes place in the wilds of Mexico among primarily barefoot […]

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Klein, Rhee, and other district leaders endorse trends, not research

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens The authors of an article in this Sunday’s Washington Post, “How to fix our schools: A manifesto by Joel Klein, Michelle Rhee and other education leaders,” state, “So, where do we start? With the basics. As President Obama has emphasized, the single most important factor determining whether students succeed in school is not the color […]

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The Global University?

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney When I was in college, a new travel guide came out geared toward my niche: young backpackers who liked to hitchhike. It was a fun guide that gave me some tips about where young college students would want to visit in Europe. Parents could have their Frommer’s and Foder’s; I liked this […]

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Financial Aid: Part V by Kristan Venegas

By Stefani Relles

Our fifth and final installment of a week’s long discussion about financial aid with Dr. Kristan Venegas posts today. Next week, we resume our regularly scheduled programming with Dr. William G. Tierney, Randall Clemens, Thursday is TechDay and a Fridays by Numbers chart. What about the students who are not financial aid eligible? by Kristan […]

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