Featured News Posts

Recent News

Who’s been naughty and who’s been nice in 2010

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney It’s that time of year to see who should get coal in the stocking and who should get a present. Here goes: Naughty UC administrators and faculty:  Sorry guys, but you are in deep, deep denial.  The system is in fiscal meltdown and the administration seems to act like a little nip here […]

Continue Reading →

A holiday gift for that special ed historian in your life

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens David Labaree dedicates his newest book–Someone Has to Fail: The Zero-Sum Game of Public Schooling–to David Tyack and Larry Cuban, two prominent education historians. The dedication serves as a guidepost. Labaree, like the two authors of Tinkering toward Utopia, is a skeptic of education reform, and he uses the same critical lens […]

Continue Reading →

First Fridays with Mark DeFusco

By Stefani Relles

We’re joined on the first Friday of each month by Dr. Mark B. DeFusco, Mark B. DeFusco, Senior Research Associate at the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis. On Gainful Employment by Mark DeFusco Two recent articles in the Chronicle of Higher Education got me thinking about the controversial new “Gainful employment” rules that are anticipated as the Department […]

Continue Reading →

Blog by Numbers: Community College Transfer

By Stefani Relles

We let the numbers do the blogging in today’s installment of our “Blog by Numbers” series featuring community college transfer statistics. This data, from the California Postsecondary Education Commission, represents the number of all Fall transfer students from a California Community College to a California four-year public institution and private institution from 2004-08. This data, from the […]

Continue Reading →

I did(n’t do) it (by) myself! – Higher education in the 21st century

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney A week or so ago I read a draft of a paper a mentee who is a sophomore is writing on the Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. I sent another email to a student who is at my alma mater – Tufts University  – to see how he’s doing and encourage […]

Continue Reading →

Using universities to improve neighborhoods

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens The University of Southern California is dedicated to its surrounding neighborhood. As mentioned in one of my previous blogs, the Neighborhood Academic Initiative is an outstanding enrichment program that improves academic outcomes for students in nearby middle and high schools. The Good Neighbors Campaign is another excellent program that raises funds to […]

Continue Reading →

Best Book of the Year – Not

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney, Kris Renn, and Susan Twombly Last spring we thought the task would be relatively easy, almost fun. Bill announced on the blog that in December, the three of us would choose the best higher ed book of the year. The purpose was to be free of political considerations or lobbying and instead choose […]

Continue Reading →

Thanksgiving

By Stefani Relles

“We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.” – Frederick Koenig 21st Century Scholar wishes all our readers a peaceful holiday weekend. We will resume Monday with our regular blogging schedule.

Continue Reading →

On Giving Thanks: The JFK Ultra-Marathon!

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney John F. Kennedy, channeling Teddy Roosevelt, started a series of ultra-marathons 50 years ago. Roosevelt believed any Marine should be able to run/walk 50 miles in 12 hours. Kennedy, desirous that the citizenry become more fit, challenged us to a series of “ultras.” Today, the lone JFK ultra-marathon that survives happens on […]

Continue Reading →

A thanks-giving letter to my former students

By Randy Clemens

Dear Former Students, I have spent a little over five years–sometimes successfully but most times not–trying to make education better for you and others. That is a short time compared to the lifetime that you’ve spent in inadequate schools, I know. I recognized that early on. After breaking my ankle two weeks into my teaching […]

Continue Reading →