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Graduation!

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens In my second year of teaching, I had the privilege of teaching two ninth grade honors classes. The students were the most precocious that I’ve ever encountered. I would dream up lesson plans on the weekend, and they would repay my daring during the week. I remember creating Club Verona for a […]

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On Trust: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of my favorite magazines is The Economist.  Granted, their politics are to my right, but the writing is crisp, informed, and thoughtful, occasionally even delightfully quirky.  I will write about the Bayh-Dole act in a week or two, but they made a comment a while ago that has stuck with me.  […]

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Making decisions for students: Who knows best?

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Many of my friends are musicians. We often wonder if musicians hear music differently from non-musicians. I think the answer is yes. The argument extends to other domains with less clear distinctions. Is a coach with playing experience superior to a coach without playing experience? Now the question is slightly different. First, […]

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On Trust: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney This is from a book about science and ethics: “When you write about this stuff, you feel like a pompous jackass. At least I do. Because it sounds as though I’m preaching. [However] if you’re a mountain climber, you actually believe in trust. Roping up with somebody’s who’s going to save your […]

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Advice from One Future Doctor to Another

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens During my last year of teaching, I decided to pursue an Ed.D. The search process was simple. I started with cities where I thought I could live and teach–Washington, D.C., New York, Boston, Austin, Boulder, and Berkeley. I had dreams of New York, where I could ride the subway to everything, of Austin, […]

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How do you spell “homophobia”?: AERA

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Three years ago NCATE – the national teacher education accreditation association – was going to implement a new policy that excluded sexual orientation.  Some individuals wrote to the AERA Council and encouraged them to take a stand.  The President, the Council, and the Executive Director did not.  The rationale given was that […]

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The Other Side of Shared Governance

By Yvonna Lincoln

Today’s post is by guest scholar, Yvonna S. Lincoln. About the author: Yvonna S, Lincoln is Professor of Higher Education and Educational Administration at Texas A & M University. She is author, coauthor, or editor of such books as Naturalistic Inquiry and Fourth Generation Evaluation (both with Egon G. Guba), and Organizational Theory and Inquiry. by Yvonna S. Lincoln […]

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AERA Needs a Digital Makeover

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens I am sorry to inform you, but the American Educational Research Association’s annual meeting is going the way of the dodo bird. It’s time for an upgrade. Throughout the meeting, I was continually struck by a lack of innovation despite countless opportunities. As I waited in a ballroom for a session to […]

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Postscript on AERA

By Bill Tierney

By Bill Tierney AERA had about 12,000 people in attendance this year – that’s down about 1,500 participants from last year.  What’s the reason for lower attendance?  AERA was a bit later than normal and the end of the school year may have interfered.  Some people supposedly don’t like to go to Denver.  Travel budgets […]

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Undocumented Students: Part V

By Bill Tierney

We wrap up our series on undocumented students this week with concluding remarks by 21st Century Scholar’s own Bill Tierney. The Heart of the Matter by Bill Tierney Four years ago I helped a high school senior in a low-income school apply to college.  He was a model student – head of student government, excellent […]

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