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On Leadership: Part II

By Bill Tierney

By Bill Tierney I mentioned previously that Steve Sample is stepping down as president of USC in August.  Our current provost, Max Nikias, will become president. One of the interesting aspects of a private university is the difference between culture and laws.  Laws regulate from the outside in:  we do something because the law says […]

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Duncan highlights the need for parent involvement

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently said he wanted to require “parent and community input” in the reauthorization of Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Afterwards, National Journal’s Education Experts, a blog featuring an array of education professionals, posed the question “Can Communities and Parents Help Turn Around Schools?” The prompt elicited a […]

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On Leadership: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Quick quiz.  Who said this: Courage! What makes a king out of a slave?  Courage!  What makes the mast on the flag to wave?  Courage!  What makes the elephant charge his tusk in the misty mist, or the dusky dusk?  What makes the muskrat guard his musk?  Courage!  What makes the Hottentot […]

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Pathfinder update

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin I am happy to announce that the Pathfinder project has been awarded a $103,281 grant from the TG Foundation to conduct a study entitled “Increasing College Access through Digital Technologies.”  CHEPA is partnering with Dr. Gisele Ragusa from Rossier’s Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) on this project.  We will begin […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part III

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Assume the opposite of the situation I actually have at USC.  Assume I am deeply disappointed in my university president.  I send emails to my trusted colleagues and suggest that we put forward a vote of no confidence in the president.  I offer as evidence a variety of issues where I feel […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Assume our usual email address is the university’s server.  I get, roughly, 50 email messages a day and another 20 that are purely junk.  I work at a private university, and like the mailbox where I receive paper correspondence, I always have assumed that the university has the right to circumscribe what […]

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Snapshots of injustice: Using data to tell a story

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens During a recent meeting, Bill and I discussed different ways to present data. Being a skilled and socially responsible researcher is not simply about designing and executing an elegant study. Presentation matters. The reasons are multiple: Researchers now need to search for funding; asking for money from a foundation includes a level […]

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Technology and Academic Freedom: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Bob O’Neil has written a nice book, Academic Freedom in the Wired World: Political Extremism, Corporate Power, and the University, which I’m not going to review, but I’d like to pass along some thoughts the book gave me about technology and academic freedom, Most of us use university servers for our email […]

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As libraries go virtual

By Zoe B. Corwin

During my freshman year at UCLA I remember phoning my parents from the library. (There must have been a phone booth tucked away on one of the floors.  Remember those?)  I had been finding books for a research project and felt excited and important and connected to a legacy of students and scholars before me.  […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Ninging

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Over the last several posts, I’ve been approaching the subject of technology and education rather conceptually. Briefly, I’ve discussed the basic tenets of Web 2.0 applications and services. It all boils down to a widespread shift in the way we think about, develop and ultimately use technology. Uploading is so 2004. Today’s […]

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