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Thursday is TechDay

By Stefani Relles

Today’s Thursday is TechDay is a critique and a celebration. I recently attended the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) annual meeting in Charlotte and there is much to report about the role online communication technologies are (and aren’t) playing in the postsecondary research community. The critique is the obvious stuff: No wifi […]

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World AIDS Day

By Bill Tierney

World AIDS day is tomorrow, December 1. Here are some memories in commemoration of the day: When I was in graduate school an odd disease was beginning to infect gay men. By the time I had left Stanford and moved to my postdoc in Boulder, Colorado AIDS panic had arrived. I also had met Barry. […]

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Getting to the truth: Doing research with teenagers

By Randy Clemens

Credibility is the first (and most important) criteria for establishing trustworthiness in qualitative research. Credibility, like it’s step-sibling validity, is often the subject of much debate; scholars argue about what it can and cannot do and what strategies researchers should and should not use to ensure rigor in research (see “Varieties of Validity: Quality in […]

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On facts, contexts, causality, and probability

By Bill Tierney

People are 10 times more likely to kill themselves in a city than other kinds of environments. The hours between 12:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. are when most people kill themselves. If you don’t drink coffee your chances of suicide are three times higher than if you did. A man with tattoos on his lower […]

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Giving thanks now and in the future

By Randy Clemens

Now is the time to give thanks. I am thankful for having good health, professional successes, and old and new friends and family. When I consider major trends in education, however, giving thanks is more difficult.  Don’t get me wrong—there are people and events for which to be thankful. This year, Governor Brown signed legislation […]

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Fraternities in America

By Bill Tierney

When I was in college I read The Idea of Fraternity in America by Wilson Carey McWilliams. I was impressed enough with the book that I kept it all these years and I reread it a year or so ago. McWilliams’s book, unfortunately, has fallen by the wayside. He writes beautifully and offers an impressive […]

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“Power of place”: Highlighting students’ perceptions

“Power of place”: Highlighting students’ perceptions

By Jonathan Mathis

I call it a blessing to spend time learning from high school students. You might think I am crazy for electing to design research activity that promotes what Geertz’s describes as “thick description.” I honestly enjoy the energy housed in high schools, and smile at what is perceived to be “drama” for adolescents. We must […]

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Net price calculators + loan debt + major choice= stressed out decision making

By Kristan Venegas

The Thrusday Pop This fall, I am teaching about 45 first-year graduate students. When I look back on the first 14 weeks of the semester, I am struck by how stressed out they are. Yes, there is the usual stuff about writing good papers, managing class participation, and making connections in a new social setting. […]

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Scholars at risk

By Bill Tierney

Too often we get consumed by our own situations and forget the plight of others. As I’ve written blogs over the years I have despaired at budget cuts and administrative excesses. I have pointed out the importance of clear standards for promotion and tenure and called for greater faculty voice in shared governance. I mean […]

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Social movements 2.0

By Randy Clemens

Technology is changing the ways in which people communicate their thoughts and experience their surroundings. Augmented reality apps, for instance, add layers of information to places like museum exhibits and sporting events. Twitter connects individuals to trends. Social networking sites provide quick access to information about nearby places including parks and movie theaters. In their […]

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