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Learning how to play music and conduct research

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Every night, I try to find at least 10 minutes to sit at my practice pad. I drill rudiments. I work on my double-stroke roll. I sight read–my least favorite exercise. If I have a little more time, I move to the drum set. There I work on some speed and coordination […]

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Reflections in Place

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Over the years I have spent a fair amount of time in Indian Country.  Some years ago I wrote a book about the challenges Native youth face enroute to college; I also edited an issue of Change magazine about Native Americans and higher education.  I’ve met many people in my travels in […]

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First Friday with Mark DeFusco

By Mark DeFusco

Is it Time to Privatize?  How to Compete in Lean Years   by Mark DeFusco, Ph.D. I was struck by a recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education that discussed Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett’s plan to cut appropriations by around 50% to four state related institutions including Penn State.   This would be the biggest one […]

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The Thursday Pop by Kristan Venegas

By Kristan Venegas

Undercover Boss: Going undercover and giving financial aid by Kristan Venegas I know there was a lot going on this past Sunday night—the reports of Bin Laden’s death were flooding world-wide media, but I’m hoping that many of you were able to see CBS’s season finale of Undercover Boss. The premise of the show is […]

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On Goebbels, Pizza, and Gainful Employment

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Hitler’s propagandist, Joseph Goebbels, famously said “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus […]

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On issues of trustworthiness in qualitative research

By Randy Clemens

By Randy Clemens Trustworthiness–frequently referred to as validity and reliability–in qualitative research involves two intertwined parts: process and product. What are the strategies necessary for a researcher to conduct rigorous research? And, how does a researcher present data in order to maximize trustworthiness? Reflexivity performs a central task to both process and product. In other […]

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Reconsidering Cultural Capital: Tchaikovsky, Kid Cudi and the Soundtracks to Our Lives

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I forget why it happened but when I was in college I found out that you could get half priced tickets as a student if you rushed the Boston Symphony (BSO) two hours before the concert.  Even better was that there was a steak and beer house about a block away that […]

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Long Live the King and Queen!

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin  Today is the day of the Royal wedding.  Have you heard? Are you tweeting about it?  Will you participate in an ABC News/Twitterfest intended to engage viewers?  With all the royal fuss, I’ve been thinking a bit about my childhood – and about manners.  I was born in England – in a […]

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Thursday is TechDay: Once Upon a Wiki

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles This is a tech story. It is the story of Wikipedia (as told in The Wikipedia Revolution), and I post it as a parable for today’s Tech Tip. The story is esoteric, the tip, however, is not: When it comes to technology, be bold because that is where the good stuff happens. Onto the […]

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The Weaknesses of the Checklist

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney The problem with checklists can be that they become an obsession and/or what gets put on the checklist is of varying importance but it appears they are all equally important. Here are two examples: The Obsessive Checklist: “Put garbage out; make sure to put in black bin – not the blue one!; […]

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