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Helping Higher Education Get its Groove Back: Part V

By Bill Tierney

Thanks to Mark Pelesh, Jorge Klor de Alva, Doug Burleson, and Mark De Fusco for contributing to our discussion of for-profit universities this week. We cap the week off with a post by Bill Tierney concerning revamping the California postsecondary system. Rethinking the Master Plan by Bill Tierney I co-hosted a meeting recently of a […]

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For-Profit Universities: Part IV by Mark DeFusco

By Stefani Relles

21st Century Scholar continues its conversation about for-profit universities with a post by Mark De Fusco. About the author: Mark DeFusco joined Berkery Noyes with long and varied experience in higher education management. He served as chief executive officer/president at Vatterott Education Holdings, a private equity-held, for-profit college with 20 campuses in nine Midwestern states. Earlier, Mark […]

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For-Profit Universities: Part III by Douglas Burleson

By Stefani Relles

This week, 21st Century Scholar continues its conversation about for-profit universities with a post by Doug Burleson. About the author: Doug Burleson is a research assistant in the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) working with Dr. William Tierney. His research interests include issues of college preparation and access as well as how educational quality […]

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For-Profit Universities: Part II by Jorge Klor de Alva

By Stefani Relles

This week, 21st Century Scholar converses about for-profit universities with 5 participating guest scholars. Today’s author is Jorge Klor de Alva. About the author: Dr. Jorge Klor de Alva became Senior Vice President for Academic Excellence and Director of the University of Phoenix National Research Center in August 2007. He was President of Latin America Operations […]

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For-Profit Universities: Part I by Mark Pelesh

By Stefani Relles

This week, 21st Century Scholar converses about for-profit universities with 5 participating guest scholars: Mark Pelesh, Jorge Klor de Alva, Doug Burleson, and Mark De Fusco. About today’s author: Mark L. Pelesh is Executive Vice President, Legislative & Regulatory Affairs of Corinthian Colleges, Inc. Prior to joining Corinthian, Mr. Pelesh was a partner in the Washington DC law firm […]

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Graduation!

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens In my second year of teaching, I had the privilege of teaching two ninth grade honors classes. The students were the most precocious that I’ve ever encountered. I would dream up lesson plans on the weekend, and they would repay my daring during the week. I remember creating Club Verona for a […]

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On Trust: Part II

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of my favorite magazines is The Economist.  Granted, their politics are to my right, but the writing is crisp, informed, and thoughtful, occasionally even delightfully quirky.  I will write about the Bayh-Dole act in a week or two, but they made a comment a while ago that has stuck with me.  […]

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Making decisions for students: Who knows best?

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Many of my friends are musicians. We often wonder if musicians hear music differently from non-musicians. I think the answer is yes. The argument extends to other domains with less clear distinctions. Is a coach with playing experience superior to a coach without playing experience? Now the question is slightly different. First, […]

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On Trust: Part I

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney This is from a book about science and ethics: “When you write about this stuff, you feel like a pompous jackass. At least I do. Because it sounds as though I’m preaching. [However] if you’re a mountain climber, you actually believe in trust. Roping up with somebody’s who’s going to save your […]

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Advice from One Future Doctor to Another

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens During my last year of teaching, I decided to pursue an Ed.D. The search process was simple. I started with cities where I thought I could live and teach–Washington, D.C., New York, Boston, Austin, Boulder, and Berkeley. I had dreams of New York, where I could ride the subway to everything, of Austin, […]

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