Featured News Posts

Recent News

At the Movies III: Blackboard Jungle and To Sir, with Love

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Blackboard Jungle opens with a screen saying “We are fortunate to have a school system that is a tribute to our American community and our children. But we are now threatened by something that has to change—juvenile delinquency.” Glenn Ford, in 1955, comes to the rescue in an inner-city school. The movie […]

Continue Reading →

Thursday is TechDay: To technology or not to technology, that is the question

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles We at CHEPA are about to commence the 11th annual SummerTIME writing program this month. So in this context of college access, I’ve been thinking a lot about technology and it’s role in preparing so-called underprepared students to write at the college-level. Here’s the rub, despite the fact that I am a […]

Continue Reading →

At the Movies II: The Lottery

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Here’s another movie on the same theme as Waiting for Superman and The Cartel. We have four cute kids who are trying to get into “good” (a.k.a. “charter”) schools in Harlem by way of a lottery. Geoffrey Canada once again is the voice of reason saying how important good schools are and […]

Continue Reading →

The life of a PhD student: Thirty days to qualify

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens You don’t know until you know. That’s one of the biggest lessons I’ve learned from being in a PhD program. And, if you do know, you probably aren’t doing it the right way. Earning a PhD is a struggle. There are ups and downs and downs and even more downs. When you […]

Continue Reading →

At the Movies I: The Cartel—Two Thumbs Down

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney At least the graphics and background music in Waiting for Superman were professionally done. In The Cartel we have another documentary about schools made by a reporter, Bob Bowden; this time the storyline is largely about New Jersey public schools. Early on in the movie he gives us a voiceover that what […]

Continue Reading →

Emerging trends at the E3

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin The E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) at the Los Angeles Convention Center is one of the premier events in the computer and video game world.  Amidst the incredible hype surrounding the event, new games are revealed in what has become a multibillion dollar industry.  The show does not have an educational focus, but […]

Continue Reading →

The Thursday Pop with Kristan Venegas

By Kristan Venegas

My financial aid & Facebook experiment: “Pregunta about financial aid, race, and class” As I mentioned in my blog on May 19th, I was working with David Levy and the College Access Foundation to put on a series of workshops related to reading financial aid offers. We included the basics as well as some “inside […]

Continue Reading →

Summer Reading

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney One of the great aspects of ‘SC is that we wrap up spring semester by mid-May. The summer stretches out seemingly forever and all those books I have on my shelf or on my Kindle I finally think I will be able to read. But, I can’t read everything, so here are […]

Continue Reading →

Sample size isn’t everything

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens I’m nearing the end of the written portion of my qualifying exam (thankfully), and I’ve been thinking a lot about a lot. In particular, I keep returning to a similar theme: Academics have short memories. Consider, for instance, the sad story of life history: Less than a century ago, life histories were […]

Continue Reading →

How to Work in the Summer

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Summers are a time of opportunity, but often they end up being lost opportunity. Years ago a psychologist, Bob Boice, did a ton of research about how to increase productivity of early-career faculty. One of his findings was that individuals tended to put off until the summer to write something “big” —the […]

Continue Reading →