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Transfer Mandates

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Assume that 18 year old Ricardo goes to a community college, a Cal State, a UC, a private such as USC or La Verne, or a for-profit such as the University of Phoenix.  Assume also that he takes a non-remedial class that is the introductory English course the institution offers.  And to […]

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Innovation and the Academic Paradox

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Firm A, after 25 years competing, is an established industry leader. Some in the company think leadership, at one time pioneering, operates  too conservatively. The company, however, has perfected its widget, giving customers sound, predictable products. Firm B is a start-up. Two Ph.D. students liked Firm A’s widget, but also thought technology could […]

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Higher Education? – Indeed

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Andrew Hacker has been writing about poverty for as long as I have been in the academy.  His writing is elegant, thoughtful, and provocative.  His work in the New York Review of Books is the sort of article I turn to first when I open the Review.  I approached his book, Higher […]

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First Fridays with Mark DeFusco: November

By Stefani Relles

On the first Friday of each month, we’re joined by guest scholar, Mark DeFusco. Want to know more about Mark? For a PBS Frontline interview, click here. First Friday – Revisited by Dr. Mark DeFusco First Fridays used to hold particular significance to me growing up.   My parents, offspring of immigrants, took great pride in enrolling […]

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Appointing Professors

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I have two regrettable worries here, both signs of the current times, and both likely to decrease the quality of academic life.  Both stories revolve around academic appointments. Case #1: Who appoints professors? Ultimately, the Board and President do, just as they are responsible for everything else at the institution.  But it […]

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PC University!

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Many years ago a friend came over to my house shaking his head about his parenting skills.  His 5 year old son had been hitting his four year old sister.  In turn, my friend had spanked his son as a way to teach him not to hit his sister.  “Somehow I think […]

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Secretary Duncan and education as social justice

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently received a service award from Harvard’s Phillips Brooks House Association, a student-directed social service organization. During his speech, he rightly stated that education is the civil rights issue of our generation. Secretary Duncan’s speech is a necessary piece–the acknowledgement of inequitable opportunities and resources–to completing […]

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Retirement Planning and Pension Reform 101

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney A great many decisions for me at base are philosophical statements about how we think we should live our lives.  Social security to me is a belief that we are all connected and that in our later years we should enable individuals to receive some economic benefit so they are not reduced […]

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Blog by Numbers: College Graduation Rates

By Stefani Relles

We continue our Blog by Numbers series where we let the statistics do the talking. This one chart shows graduate rates for the UC and CSU.  There are many reasons why so few students graduate in 4 years. But at a time when many are saying students should graduate in less than 4 years, what does […]

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Human subjects and righteous dopefiends

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Philippe Bourgois wrote In Search of Respect over a decade ago and I have used it repeatedly in my classes and in my writing.  His latest book, Righteous Dopefiend, written with Jeff Schonberg, is a fitting follow-up.  They spent ten years with a group of homeless people addicted to heroin.  The book […]

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