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Dealing with Reporters: 5 Points to Keep in Mind

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Deadlines:  Many reporters are on deadline. When they say they need to talk to you today, they mean “today”—not when you get around to calling them back. You know how Woody Allen said, “80% of success is just showing up.” Well, 80% of being successful with reporters is being cognizant of their […]

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Part I: Heroes, villains, and democratic action

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens In the comic book universe, identifying superheroes and supervillains is relatively easy. For instance, if you can’t tell by the ominous outfit or menacing scowl, you can certainly recognize villains by their evil machinations to takeover and/or destroy the world. In the education reform universe, the task is not so simple. First, […]

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Transfer Inefficiencies

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney In a recent study, the Los Rios Community College District reported that most of their students now transfer to a private non- or for-profit institution rather than a UC or CSU. One might think that the logical point of transfer for a community college student is the CSU but the report indicates […]

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On Siblings

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney I thought I may as well finish this week out with two educational memories of my brothers. Both are older than me, and both are entirely different from one another. Although they both graduated from the University of Notre Dame and both were in the Peace Corps, Paul has been an extremely […]

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The Thursday Pop with Kristan Venegas

By Kristan Venegas

Communicating financial aid and financial literacy: Why are we still holding on to our radio star status? Do you remember Buggles? I had to smile as I wrote that! Some of you might know their big hit song from the video game GTA Vice City, but I have always associated Video Killed the Radio Star […]

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On Mothers

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Since I just offered a memory of my dad because it was Father’s Day, I thought a memory of my mother might be appropriate since I didn’t say anything on Mother’s Day. My mother was a woman before her time. I suspect if she had come of age in the 1960s she […]

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Summer vacation, four-day school weeks, and the achievement gap

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Most students across the country–unless they attend year-round schools–are beginning summer vacation, a curious relic of a bygone age. At the turn of the 19th century, a three-month summer break made sense. Schools did not have air conditioning. Wealthy urban families vacationed. Middle- and lower-class urban families wanted to vacation. Agrarian communities […]

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On Fathers

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Since yesterday was Father’s Day I thought a memory of my father might be appropriate. My father would have turned 100 this past April. He was the youngest of nine in an Irish Catholic family and the first to go to college—Fordham. He transferred from St. John’s to Fordham because the family […]

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At the Movies III: Blackboard Jungle and To Sir, with Love

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Blackboard Jungle opens with a screen saying “We are fortunate to have a school system that is a tribute to our American community and our children. But we are now threatened by something that has to change—juvenile delinquency.” Glenn Ford, in 1955, comes to the rescue in an inner-city school. The movie […]

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Thursday is TechDay: To technology or not to technology, that is the question

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles We at CHEPA are about to commence the 11th annual SummerTIME writing program this month. So in this context of college access, I’ve been thinking a lot about technology and it’s role in preparing so-called underprepared students to write at the college-level. Here’s the rub, despite the fact that I am a […]

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