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Guest Blogger: Professor Linda Serra Hagedorn on The Academic Life

By Lorraine Solaegui

This week 21st Century Scholar is delighted to host Linda Serra Hagedorn as our guest blogger.  Linda Serra Hagedorn is Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs, and professor at Iowa State University.  Dr. Hagedorn’s research focuses on college student success.  She is especially interested in issues pertaining to underrepresented student groups, and equity.  Prior to joining […]

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What might Gee say about texting in class?

By Zoe B. Corwin

by Zoe Corwin On Wednesday nights, I teach Applied Ethnography .  This semester I have a particularly engaged group of Masters students.  Two weeks ago, the duo facilitating discussion of one of the readings asked their colleagues to take out their cell phones and text answers to questions they posed about their assigned article.  The […]

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Preparing the Underprepared: From Rubric to Checklist

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles The underpreparedness of postsecondary students has gained visibility as a vexing and growing problem. Summer bridge opportunities like CHEPA’s SummerTIME writing program are one of the many ways higher education is responding to the need to prepare students – particularly first generation, low-income, minority students – for college-level work before they matriculate […]

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Yvonna Lincoln: From the Shared Governance Front

By Yvonna Lincoln

Today 21st Century Scholar welcomes Yvonna Lincoln as our guest blogger!  Dr. Lincoln is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education and Program Chair of the Higher Education Administration Program at Texas A&M University. In a move not recorded anywhere for many, many decades, the Board of Regents of the fourth largest university in the U.S. has […]

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Rubrics make expectations transparent

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens My mom went to Catholic schools. She chose to send me to public schools. From the stories my mom has told, I understand why. Nuns, back then, liked to smack with rulers students for being difficult and asking a lot of questions. The nuns didn’t give many answers either. If a student asked “Why”, the […]

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Survival Strategies for Troubled Institutions

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney, Guilbert (Gib) Hentschke, and Mark DeFusco Arguably, higher education is facing the toughest times it has faced in the last century.  Public institutions have seen their budgets decimated.  Private institutions have seen donations decline and consumers unable to pay tuition.  Endowments are just beginning to rebound.  For-profit colleges and universities have come […]

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First Friday with Mark DeFusco

By Mark DeFusco

  Why investors like the For-Profit Higher Education Business – A lesson in architecture.  by Mark DeFusco I was recently invited by the Observatory on Borderless Higher Education to speak at their 2011 Global Forum in Vancouver.  They want me to speak about why private equity is so interested in education worldwide, and to participate […]

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The Thursday Pop by Kristan Venegas: Reno and RuPaul

By Kristan Venegas

Reno and RuPaul: What are “legitimate” minorities? Who are the “legitimate” poor?  In my last Pop blog, I mentioned my love for RuPaul’s Drag Race. There are some interesting things happening there along the lines of race—both In terms of how we perform and construct it and in terms of who “can” and “can’t” perform […]

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Do the Math (even if you’re getting a PhD in English)

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney The most expensive component of teaching is a PhD program.  Classes are generally smaller – much smaller – than undergraduate classes, and doctoral students require individualized instruction.  Doctoral students also do not pay full tuition as their undergraduate peers frequently do.  Indeed, they cost money.  Faculty like working with graduate students, however, […]

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Money matters and districts don’t have it

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens There’s a rumor going around that the country’s economy has turned a corner. The Great Recession is over. I don’t know the metrics that pundits and politicians are using, but if we consider the financial stability (or instability) of school districts, the recession is certainly not over. Consider, for instance, the case […]

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