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Academic Moneyball

By Bill Tierney

It’s funny how a word can catch currency and all of a sudden you see it everywhere. The latest term of note is “moneyball.” Michael Lewis invented the idea with his book about the Oakland A’s general manager, Billy Beane. Brad Pitt recently starred as Beane in the movie of the same name. The idea […]

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Are the Kids Really Alright?

By Randy Clemens

A few weeks ago the New York Times published a blog entitled “The Kids Are More Than Alright.” The author had several major points: Teenagers’ use of marijuana is lower than it was 30 years ago. Teenagers’ use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs is far lower than it was 30 years ago. Teenagers have […]

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A Professor by Any Other Name …

By Maria Maisto

It doesn’t take long, once you decide to explore the issue of non-tenure-track (NTT) faculty, to come up against one of the biggest stumbling blocks to communication and to action: the thorny question of terminology. In the New Faculty Majority’s (NFM) early days, the problem of nomenclature became evident almost immediately and even threatened to derail […]

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Student Success as Faculty Profiles Radically Shift: Creating Institutional Solutions for Non-Tenure Track Faculty Majorities and Student Learning

By Adrianna Kezar

Thanks to the Teagle, Carnegie, and Spencer Foundations, we may make some headway on this difficult challenge. In partnership with the Association for American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), I will examine solutions for creating a new professoriate that best supports student learning through a process called a Delphi study. AAC&U has a longstanding agenda of […]

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What Can be Done to Address Contingency?

By Adrianna Kezar

Other proposals offered look beyond the current tenure-track model: Eradicate tenure and move to long-term, renewable contracts for all faculty Some proposals have suggested the eradication of tenure, following existing models of campuses that have either never had tenure, such as Evergreen State, or have moved to eliminate tenure, like Hampshire College. Institutions without tenure […]

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What Can Be Done? Many Proposals—No Consensus

By Adrianna Kezar

At present the most successful changes have occurred due to non-tenure-track faculty (NTTF) unionizing and bargaining for better working conditions. Maybe this is the inevitable, slow way change that will occur. NTT faculty leaders themselves are largely responsible for changes I have documented nationally. But what about big solutions rather than incremental change? There are […]

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How Did We Get Here? Budgets, Politics, and Contingency

By Adrianna Kezar

The few leaders aware of this trend (or not ignoring it) will say the issue is money; with the state budget declines, the shift in labor was necessary—inevitable. Is that true? Studies by the Delta Cost Project show that instruction costs have gone down over the last 20 years, while other costs have gone up—administrative […]

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Contingency and the Common Good

By Adrianna Kezar

This week’s blog will focus on an important and overlooked trend affecting the quality and integrity of higher education in America and worldwide—the move to a largely contingent faculty. Most people do not realize approximately 70% of the faculty are off the tenure track (50% part-time, approximately 20% full-time). In the early 1970s, these trends […]

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Special Week … Non-Tenure-Track and Contingent Faculty

By Lisa Garcia

This week’s 21st Century Scholar blog posts focus on non-tenure-track and contingent faculty. The posts are written by Adrianna Kezar, Associate Professor and Associate Director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) at the USC Rossier School of Education. Adrianna explains the major challenges facing this growing group of faculty and outlines some […]

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Reciprocity and College Readiness: Authoring Mantras and Anthems

By Jonathan Mathis

Communication is a core component of David Coney’s articulation of cognitive strategies. Through argumentation, explanation, and critique, high school students might acquire and retain information necessary for college success. This idea has served as a catalyst for the first of three components of reciprocity performed in one of my research sites. As stated in my […]

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