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First Fridays with Mark DeFusco: October

By Stefani Relles

On the first Friday of each month, we’re joined by guest scholar, Mark DeFusco. Want to know more about Mark? For a PBS Frontline interview, click here. Practicality in the Last Oasis of the Imagination by Mark DeFusco Universities have the unique position in modern society to be the last Bastion (outside the clergy perhaps) […]

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Thursday is TechDay: The answer to your password prayers

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles Are you one of those tech users who has all sorts of passwords for all sorts of websites? Can’t remember if there’s a numeral or an uppercase in this one or that? Do you find yourself clicking on the “forgot your password?” button more often than you’d like to admit? This post […]

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Bullying and AERA

By Bill Tierney

This was made in response to a gay teenager committing suicide because he had been bullied in high school: [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IcVyvg2Qlo] Tell me again why AERA can’t do something like this – today? Is it because there’s not enough research that says enough gay teenagers are bullied? How much is enough? – Bill Tierney

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Beware: That reform may be a scam

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens Throughout the black blizzards of the Dust Bowl, confidence men defrauded desperate men and women by auguring rain. Some promised to release mysterious rainmaking chemicals into the air; others said they would blast the clouds apart with balloons and dynamite. These charlatans made decent incomes from false promises. What’s the lesson to be […]

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“Non-Vital” Budget Cuts

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney After our visit to Turkey last summer, we spent a few days in London before heading home.  The U.K. has as much of a deficit problem as the United States and the conservative David Cameron had just become PM.  One night we returned from a play – All My Sons – (superb!) […]

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Superman and Chainsaws

By Zoe B. Corwin

Most of my blog entries for the 21st Century Scholar discuss games or technology.  I have been arguing that game-based strategies have the potential to increase postsecondary opportunities for low-income students.  I will return to the theme in subsequent blogs.  Today I want to write about what is NOT a game.  Earlier this evening, I […]

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Booleans: The fountain of digital youth

By Stefani Relles

by Stefani Relles What would you say if I promised that reading today’s post will prolong your life? For those of you who believe that learning to use new technology takes too long, this one’s for you. Sure, it’s counterintuitive to spend hours getting up to speed on new software when the “old version” seems […]

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Canaries in the Academic Coal Mine

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Canaries are delicate birds that are susceptible to drafts.   Coal miners have long brought these fragile creatures into coal mines because the health and well-being of these little birds tells them something about the mine.  If canaries die, then the coal miners know, hopefully not too late, that the mine has had […]

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Katy Perry, you’re awesome; Tom Jefferson, you need a makeover.

By Randy Clemens

by Randy Clemens High school students know who Katy Perry is. She’s a socialite. She has a song, “I Kissed a Girl.” She dated the tattooed guy from Gym Class Heroes and now is engaged to  the funny guy from Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Teenagers could, I’m sure, also fill-in-the-blanks for numerous other pop culture figures: […]

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Debt Burden: Part II + Academic Research

By Bill Tierney

by Bill Tierney Here’s an interesting point about the need for research in a particular area, and how important it is that academics do it. The Government Accounting Office (GAO) did a study, of sorts, of 15 for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs).  They found misconduct and fraud at virtually all of the 15 institutions.  They […]

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