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Tomorrow is Independence Day

By Lisa Garcia

Tomorrow is Independence Day. For many, July 4 is a day of rest spent with family and/or friends eating and drinking (and in my case avoiding getting a really bad sunburn). In the spirit of the holiday, I wanted to point out two random facts about Independence Day … 8 of the 56 signers of […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences IV: Final Considerations

By Bill Tierney

This is the fourth installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here, Part II is here, and Part III is here. Last year, the California State Legislature considered outsourcing courses to external providers. The Democratic-controlled legislature was troubled that students could not get the classes they needed. The […]

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Commissioners, Campaigns, and Crazy Kittens

By Zoe B. Corwin

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of speaking during the public comment session at the California Student Aid Commission meeting. Every month, Governor-appointed Commissioners meet to tackle some of the challenges mentioned in the most recent string of 21st Century Scholar blog posts. We have been working closely with the Commission over the […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences III: “Lead Generation” and Slippery Slopes in Higher Education

By Bill Tierney

This is the third installment in a four-part series focusing on outsourcing in higher education. Part I is here and Part II is here. Until September 2013, the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) prohibited the use of commissioned agents in international student recruitment. There are numerous purist reasons to disdain what has come […]

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Stats, Stories, and Policy Design

By Randy Clemens

In my last post, I mentioned Illinois’ new testing plan, which sets different testing standards based on student demographics including race and class. The policy oozes the flawed logic that has defined the accountability era: Statistics—and experimental and quasi-experimental studies, in particular—represent the gold standard of educational research. Before you either tune me in or […]

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Ivory Tower Sounds the Alarm and is A Call to Action To Address the Student Loan Crisis

By Daniel Almeida

I went to see the documentary Ivory Tower last Friday. The movie was well done and very informative about the state of higher education and more specifically the student loan crisis in the United States. Although I didn’t hear all that much that I hadn’t known already, the barrage of bad news during the documentary […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences II: The Philosophical and Ethical Issues Raised by Outsourcing

By Bill Tierney

Apart from the economic premises I raised earlier, outsourcing is also a philosophical principle about how an organization should run its affairs. Once an institution agrees that outsourcing is a credible way to manage resources, it ends up on that proverbial “slippery slope.” I am not suggesting that outsourcing is inherently wrong or ought never […]

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Mid-Program Reflection … SummerTIME 2014

By Lisa Garcia

We’re in the middle of our annual SummerTIME Program. The students arrived last Monday and they’re with us until next Wednesday. This is my seventh year being involved in SummerTIME and my first year directing it on my own. I’m lucky to have a handful of dedicated student workers and a full-time assistant—most of which […]

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Outsourcing and Its Consequences I: The Economic Justifications for Outsourcing

By Bill Tierney

I’d like to spend the next few days thinking about outsourcing. What do we gain and lose when we outsource jobs at a university? On one level, outsourcing makes sense. Private and public colleges and universities are non-profit entities facing hard financial times. The goal of cutting costs, while maintaining the viability of the “product” […]

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Financial Literacy Can Start in K–12 Schools

By Isabel Morales

Last year, I studied the decision-making processes of graduate students enrolled in master’s programs with Dr. Kristan Venegas and colleagues in the Rossier Ed.D. program. One of our most interesting findings was that an overwhelming majority of master’s-level students had not given a considerable amount of thought to the repayment of their educational loans, saying […]

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