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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

By Bill Tierney

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

By Cathryn Dhanatya

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

By Bill Tierney

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Rites of Fall—A Reflection on Erich Fromm

By Mark DeFusco

Modern man has transformed himself into a commodity; he experiences his life energy as an investment with which he should make the highest profit, considering his position and the situation on the personality market. He is alienated from himself, from his fellow men and from nature. His main aim is profitable exchange of his skills, […]

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Seven Weeks In and …

By Lisa Garcia

Part of my responsibilities here in the Pullias Center for Higher Education is overseeing the Increasing Access via Mentoring (I AM) Program—one of the center’s two outreach programs. I AM is an action-based intensive mentoring model where USC staff and graduate students guide Los Angeles area college-ready high school seniors through the college and financial aid […]

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Killing Corinthian: Now What?

By Bill Tierney

I don’t wish to rehearse the news about what has happened to Corinthian since it has been well reported in multiple outlets. (Click here, here, and here for more information.) Here’s my question: Corinthian has about 75,000 students and about 27,000 of them are in California. The students have been getting about $1.4 billion in […]

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Personal Belief Exemptions

By Cathryn Dhanatya

Over the last few weeks, social media has been abuzz with discussions related to the issue of Personal Belief Exemptions or PBEs in preschools and kindergartens across Los Angeles. A map of the percentage of PBEs for most preschools and kindergartens in the Los Angeles area can be found here. A PBE is when a […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

By Bill Tierney

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the postsecondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence likely involve fewer tenure-track faculty. The bloom is certainly off […]

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Sexual Assault on Campus—Part IV

By Melora Sundt

What are we to do when we actually find a student responsible for sexually assaulting another person? I hope from the other blogs (see here, here, and here) you get how difficult it is to reach this point in the process, but let’s assume we’re there. Many folks are still ambivalent about what to do. […]

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Sexual Assault on Campus—Part III

By Melora Sundt

When we compound the problem of establishing whether or not consent was secured with the presence of alcohol in an alleged sexual assault case, I imagine administrators’ eyes rolling back in their heads. First question: Is it possible for a drunk woman to have consensual sex? Sure. How could a potential sex partner be sure? […]

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