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The Utility of a Sabbatical

By Bill Tierney

I didn’t know it at the time, but I’m sorry to say that I think I came of age during academe’s Golden Age in the United States. I may have entered it at the tail end of the Golden Era, but I was still part of it.   My college years, certainly full of angst and […]

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Everything Old is New Again

By Kristan Venegas

Starting July 1, I am taking on a “new” administrative role in Rossier. After an exploratory year as the Dean’s Special Projects Assistant, I decided to apply for a “new” position as the Faculty Program Lead for the Master’s Programs. And I got it. And I am grateful. I keep using the term “new” in […]

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Parents Use of Technology With Their Kids: Does it Matter?

By Antar Tichavakunda

“What are we reading tonight?” My sister and I would fight over which book we wanted our mom to read. We usually took turns choosing the story.  When we were feeling especially obstinate, my mom would make the executive decision and select the book herself.  Once my sister and I were both reading fluently, my […]

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The Utility of a Fulbright

By Bill Tierney

In my previous blog on sabbaticals I made three points:  learning something new; extend your learning; figure out your time.  Fulbrights have allowed me to do all three.  The first time I applied for a Fulbright I didn’t know much of what I was doing.  I was not that far removed from a two year […]

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Requiem for Tenure and Shared Governance at the University of Wisconsin?

By Michael Lanford

Over the past few weeks, I have condemned the treatment of University of Mississippi Chancellor Dan Jones by the Mississippi Board of Trustees, questioned the efficacy of standardized testing and university ranking systems, and even criticized my own university for its handling of graduate students in the Roski School MFA program.  With my advisor (Bill […]

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Sounding like a Broken Record

By Bill Tierney

Some years ago I was speaking with a young friend whose English was his second language.  We were on the phone and I mentioned that it was “raining cats and dogs.”  He laughed and said, “I’m not sure I understand you.”  One of my nieces has married a fellow from Nepal and when I first […]

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Why is this Girl Crying? Non-Price Competition, Part Deux

By Mark DeFusco

Back in March, I promised to elaborate on the notion that small generic colleges are often the worst prepared to consider non commodity features to focus upon.   That promise came after a simple review of how commodities generally work and how for the vast majority of non-selective universities, the demographics of the market just doesn’t […]

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What Wealthy Kids Do Doesn’t Matter — Refocusing Digital Divide Research

By Antar Tichavakunda

“I used to have three k but my account got deleted,” one of my high school students said to her friend about Instagram. Being the nosy teacher that I was, I asked, “You had three k what?” “Three k followers Mr. T. Over three thousand? Catch up Mr. T., I thought you was hip.” The […]

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The Shape of Things to Come

By Bill Tierney

Critics used to deride the use of business terminology to speak about higher education.  Students were not “consumers” because higher education was not a “business.”  Twenty years ago, even a decade ago, the language of the market seemed anathema to many of us in academe.  Such language was akin to having moneychangers in the temple. […]

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The Disconnect Between Innovation and University Rankings

By Michael Lanford

A few weeks ago, I made the case that university rankings offer little of relevance or substance to prospective students.  This week, I would like to discuss the similarly tenuous relationship between university rankings and the stated ambition of many contemporary universities to be innovative. Two years ago, the president of Arizona State University, Michael […]

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