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Tom Hanks Loves #FreeCommunityCollege and So Do I

By Randy Clemens

Is it possible for Tom Hanks to be any more lovable? Apparently, yes. Last week, the actor who made such endearing classics as “Big,” “The ‘Burbs,” and “Turner & Hooch” published an editorial about his time at Chabot Community College. After discussing his experiences, he concluded, “That place made me what I am today.” Hanks […]

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Pencils, Keyboards & Digital Citizenship

By Zoe B. Corwin

When I learned of the shooting at Charlie Hebdo, I was shocked. I turned to Facebook to find information and posted an image in solidarity with the magazine. My family and I had just spent New Year’s in Paris and I had returned to California feeling as though the City of Light had seeped into […]

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The Social Construction of Geography

By Bill Tierney

I appreciate that geography can be an iffy matter.  The way we look at the world changes the way we look at the world.  Who owns those rocky islands between Japan and China?  Do we really have to list Crimea as part of Russia now? But some things are settled, even if we don’t like […]

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On the Purpose of Education – Part 1

By Michael Lanford

About five years ago, I had the opportunity to visit a high school in the American midwest that prepared students for careers in the construction industry.  I found the school intriguing for a number of reasons.  In promotional brochures, the primary selling point of the school was the industry’s high earning potential for graduates.  Certified […]

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On Bargaining

By Bill Tierney

Over the years lots of individuals have asked me how to negotiate for a new faculty position, a new job, a raise, or a promotion.  There are three basic rules to follow: Don’t be a doormat:  Rarely do I hear of positions where there is zero negotiation.  I know it’s nice to have a job, […]

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“What’s Hot/What’s Not”: Higher Ed & Social media 2015

By Kristan Venegas

Since we are at the beginning of a new year, I’m seeing a lot more “top 10” and “trends to watch” lists. I thought I would give it a shot and offer my own. I’ve blogged about our collective social media behaviors on this blog before, but I’ve never addressed specific trends. It’s definitely something […]

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Why Mix Education and Digital Media/Gaming?

By Antar Tichavakunda

(Over the next semester, we will be dedicating Thursdays to exploring the role of technology and social media on learning and education. Many Thursday posts and guest bloggers will be related to the First in the World grant recently awarded to the Pullias Center. We encourage your feedback and look forward to the e-journey. Zoe […]

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Why Free College Tuition is a Bad Idea: Water and College

By Bill Tierney

President Obama has come out for what Tennessee has put forward, which is free college tuition at the community college level.  If we skim over the idea, it sounds terrific – go to college for free.  Who can be against that? Let’s recognize nothing is free.  Colleges have to get money from somewhere, so all […]

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Linked Learning Tuesdays

By Michael Lanford

This semester, I will be blogging on Tuesdays about a relatively new educational initiative entitled Linked Learning. In a nutshell, Linked Learning combines academic instruction with technical curricula to foster real-world skills and facilitate work-based learning. This integration, known as a “pathway,” is intended to be multidisciplinary, with collaboration between English, mathematics, science, social studies, […]

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The Small Liberal Arts, and Not-So-Liberal Arts, College: RIP

By Bill Tierney

A conundrum exists in postsecondary enrollment. I have written repeatedly that we need more students participating in the post-secondary sector. At the same time, most of public higher education seems reluctant to consider alternative models of offering degrees that would be cheaper and of consequence. This would likely involve fewer tenure track faculty. The bloom […]

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