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Financial Literacy in California: What We Know and Do Not Know

By Bill Tierney

In spring 2014, the College Access Foundation of California and the Pullias Center for Higher Education convened a group of thought leaders in the fields of financial literacy and college access to discuss the current state of financial literacy in California. Through a robust discussion, we identified roadblocks to and potential strategies for improving the […]

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The Revolution is Now?

By Kristan Venegas

It’s summer, so that must mean that I am teaching Finance in Higher Education again. And this summer, I’m teaching it a lot. I have all three sections for the Ed.D. and Master’s programs related to higher education, which means I lead the course six hours a night, three nights a week, for six weeks. […]

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Training Undergraduates for Disciplinary Writing and Research

By Michael Lanford

Imagine, for a moment, you are a world-class athlete training at a top Division 1 university as a track specialist in the 110-meter hurdles. For several years, you have endeavored to acquire several event-specific abilities that are fundamentally important for success in your event. Speed, of course, is a necessity, so the fast-twitch fibers in […]

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Creating Incentives for People to Save Energy

By Bill Tierney

What incentive do you have to turn off the lights in your office, lower the thermostat in the winter, or power down your computer? Probably not too much. I admit to liking to have my laptop on; it’s sort of a 21st century lava light—always there filling my inbox with e-mails. I don’t think there […]

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From Footnotes to the Center of the Text

By Jenna Sablan

As Michael Lujan Bevacqua writes, the island of Guam (Guåhan), is “one big American footnote”: My island is one big American footnote, Sitting black/brown as day on the bottom of every red, whitewashed and blue page Through textual treaties or wars these narrow margins are our new, now, old or eternal homes Read the rest […]

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Ten Ways to Improve Educational Outcomes for Low-Income Youth

By Bill Tierney

Double the minimum wage Create a full employment economy Give homeless youth a home End hunger Provide universal health care Treat mental illness Reduce incarceration Reduce income inequality Reduce the dropout rate Provide maternity and infant care Is there any that doubt if we did even half of these, educational outcomes would increase? If so, […]

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The Ivory Tower—An Investment or a Gamble

By Mark DeFusco

While planning to review Ivory Tower, Andrew Rossi’s inventive documentary about higher education, I felt fortunate to have an arts house landmark theatre in St Louis. But I had a friend visiting for the weekend, so I sat alone at the noon showing at the Tivoli theatre in the University City Loop. It was an […]

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Graduates and Servants

By Antar Tichavakunda

What does it mean to be an indentured servant? Ask a senior in a selective college and you might be surprised by his or her answer. This semester I interviewed over 30 undergraduate juniors and seniors about financial aid, and one interview in particular stands out. I spoke with a graduating senior who had already […]

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The Pros and Cons of Editing for Promotion, Tenure, and the Intellectual Life

By Bill Tierney

I am frequently asked about the invisible rules for promotion and tenure, or for advice on what is a good use of one’s time. These are fair questions and I’m probably the right person to ask since I am asked to review an awful lot of dossiers over the course of a year. There are […]

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How is a Dissertation Like Falling in Love?

By Jason Perkins

Even a cursory reading of pop psychology reveals that humans attempt to recreate the love they once felt from their parents in the arms of another adult later in life. Falling in love, then, is a precarious practice and—as with all hazardous yet vital life activities—there is a constant possibility of torment. So too then, […]

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