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The Academic Marketplace: Assistant Coaches and Assistant Professors

By Bill Tierney

I am a taxpayer. Obviously, I am aware that paying taxes means that I only have a partial say in how the state budget gets determined. I don’t have a line item veto and that’s entirely understandable. A member of the Tea Party doesn’t get to “x” out the public monies that go for health […]

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Strawberry Fields Forever—But What About IP?

By Bill Tierney

We go to the farmer’s market off of Sunset on Sunday mornings. The fruits and vegetables are great and it’s fun wandering around figuring out what to buy. When strawberries are in season I always buy too many since they are so luscious. I buy the ones up the coast toward Watsonville. I think they’re […]

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Friends, Lovers, and Social Media Experimentation: The Need for New Ethical Guidelines

By Randy Clemens

This summer, Facebook released findings from a controversial study. I blogged about my concerns. Less than a month later, OKCupid’s co-founder publicized his own company’s unethical experiments. What timing. The last six months, in fact, have been filled with troubling examples of data misuse and security leaks—think about it: Facebook, OKCupid, Heartbleed, Bash, and the […]

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Next Steps Continued …

By Raquel Rall

Here we go with the last 4 of my 8 suggestions for the job app process. The first four are here. Be patient … but don’t forget. I’ve learned that the process of hearing back from various positions in the academy can be slow (if you hear back at all). It is important to be […]

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The Moral Limits of Markets—II

By Bill Tierney

I’ve noticed that many of us who are senior faculty in education have shared the same lament over the last several years. As we get closer to retirement we have seen our salaries flatten out even though we remain extremely productive. On a good year we may receive a paltry 1.5% raise and many other […]

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Balancing Technology and Education

By Cathryn Dhanatya

We’ve all had this experience before. You go into a restaurant or on a plane and a child is sitting quietly or not so quietly (insert preferred technology here: Droid phone, iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire etc.) engrossed with whatever flashing app or program is on their screen. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend limiting kids’ […]

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The Moral Limits of Academic Markets—I

By Bill Tierney

For as long as I have taught graduate classes I have had a few assumptions that have set me apart from the norm: I think grades are counter-productive so I have not put grades on papers, but acknowledge that I must assign final grades. Instead, each paper I read receives about 20 comments on how […]

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Rites of Fall—A Reflection on Erich Fromm

By Mark DeFusco

Modern man has transformed himself into a commodity; he experiences his life energy as an investment with which he should make the highest profit, considering his position and the situation on the personality market. He is alienated from himself, from his fellow men and from nature. His main aim is profitable exchange of his skills, […]

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Seven Weeks In and …

By Lisa Garcia

Part of my responsibilities here in the Pullias Center for Higher Education is overseeing the Increasing Access via Mentoring (I AM) Program—one of the center’s two outreach programs. I AM is an action-based intensive mentoring model where USC staff and graduate students guide Los Angeles area college-ready high school seniors through the college and financial aid […]

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Killing Corinthian: Now What?

By Bill Tierney

I don’t wish to rehearse the news about what has happened to Corinthian since it has been well reported in multiple outlets. (Click here, here, and here for more information.) Here’s my question: Corinthian has about 75,000 students and about 27,000 of them are in California. The students have been getting about $1.4 billion in […]

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