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Summing Up II

By Bill Tierney

I noticed a few weeks back that Marquette University, to its considerable credit, has raised its minimum wage for workers to $16.00/hour.  I weighed in on this last year and suggested that USC do something similar.   I also have written about “college for all” and over time have come to see it with mixed emotions.  […]

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Melting in Summer

By Raquel Rall

In the summer after high school graduation, many college-intending students often discover themselves to be without the crucial knowledge, resources and direction necessary to smoothly transition to college.  Though they’ve completed all the high school requirements, been accepted to at least one college, applied for financial aid, and indicated their plans to enroll in postsecondary […]

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Race, Terror, and Tenure – On Collective Outrage

By Antar Tichavakunda

There’s been a lot of talk, criticism, and collective outrage about the decision to weaken tenure and shared governance at University of Wisconsin at Madison. The anger is well founded. Scholars from institutions across the nation and across disciplines expressed their opinions and often harsh criticism of the decision. The widespread response is not a […]

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Summing Up – I

By Bill Tierney

I’ve been doing this blog for over half a decade.  At some point what was irregular in the writing of it, became regular; rather than write a blog every now and then we put out a blog a day.  Various folks in the Pullias Center helped staff and write for it.  We cooked up special […]

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Marketing the College Experience: A Problem for the Online University?

By Michael Lanford

Recently, over 3,000 students who applied to the University of Florida for their undergraduate education received welcome news of their acceptance… with a single caveat: they had to take their entire first year of classes online. Back in September 2013, Florida Governor Rick Scott authorized the creation of UF Online, allocating $35 million over five years […]

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Higher Education in Hong Kong

By Bill Tierney

For the last month I have been in residence as a Fellow at the University of Hong Kong.  The Fellowship is a three-year interdisciplinary arrangement where I am in residence.  My obligations are relatively minor: we outlined a plan over a three year time horizon that involves offering a lecture or two every time I […]

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Alice Goffman, Ethics, and Advising

By Randy Clemens

A few years ago, as a graduate student at USC, I visited the American Sociological Association’s website. A name grabbed my attention. “Goffman,” I thought, “She can’t be related to the Goffman.” Alice Goffman, as it turns out, is the daughter of renowned sociologist Erving Goffman. I hurried to Google. She received her Ph.D. from […]

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We’re In This Together

By Antar Tichavakunda

Not all education conferences are the same. Before last week, the only conferences I attended were held by the American Education Researcher’s Association (AERA) conference.  Both of my experiences at AERA were transformative for my growth as a researcher and engaged academic. The conference I attended last week, Digital Media and Learning (DML), had a […]

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Why a Sabbatical to India that is a Fulbright

By Bill Tierney

The thought of applying for a Fulbright is a fun, but time-consuming, exercise.  Where in the world would you like to go that will advance your research agenda?  One mistake colleagues make when they think about sabbaticals is that they don’t start planning about what they are going to do until a semester before it […]

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Can Academic Publishing Be Disrupted?

By Michael Lanford

The proliferation of academic journals creates a problem for any scholars who want to stay up-to-date on the newest research in their fields.  Years ago, when I taught music history, it was a simple matter to walk over to the library and skim through the 15-20 journals that were central to my scholarly interests.  Today, […]

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