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Why People Talk About Dukes of Hazard, Not The Charleston Massacre

By Randy Clemens

A few weeks ago, Antar and Bill posted personal and thoughtful blogs about the Charleston Massacre and, more broadly, the repeated and targeted violence perpetrated against Black people in the United States. Antar asked “scholars to do some soul searching.” Bill wondered if he could do more. Since the tragedy, I’ve been thinking a lot […]

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Social Media and Technology in Schools–What We Can Learn from Sex Ed

By Antar Tichavakunda

I recently grabbed dinner with an educator interested in pursuing a PhD.  Before talking about preparing for graduate programs, we shared stories about our experiences teaching.  She told one story about social media, however, that bothered me. The middle school where she first taught banned all forms of social media by students on school property. […]

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A Tale of the Undocumented (Part 3): The Rough Road to Graduation

By Omar Villa

(This is third in a five part series. Read PART ONE and PART TWO) The next three years weren’t going to be easy, but I had to do everything I possibly could to be ready for the challenge. I decided to be very proactive and think strategically of ways to prepare for the upcoming years. […]

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The Importance of International Perspectives on Education

By Michael Lanford

From June 21 to August 1, I will be attending the Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnerships Institute in Taiwan.  I am looking forward to the event, as I have not had many opportunities to travel outside of the United States since I received my Masters of Education degree in 2011 from the University of […]

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The Top 10 List I Don’t Want To Be On

By Kristan Venegas

I. So this happens. I get an email from a respected colleague in Rossier, “We’re in the Top 10!” I already know what top 10 list we’re on, and it ain’t good. USC is one of the most expensive schools for graduate school debt in the US. I already knew this because I have been […]

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A Tale of the Undocumented (Part 2): Navigating My First Year in College

By Omar Villa

(This is a five part series.  Read PART ONE) My first year in college was in 2007.  It felt like an intense roller coast ride where at times I felt like my life was ready to change tracks on me at any time. First, I migrated 300 miles away from home to pursue my college […]

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The State of Writing Instruction in Higher Education – Do We Really Care?

By Michael Lanford

During the month of June, I had the privilege to teach writing classes for the Pullias Center’s SummerTIME program for the second year.  Although the time required to teach writing (on top of my research and coursework responsibilities) makes the summer a little hectic, I always look forward to the program.  I miss teaching a […]

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Micro-Aggressions: A Form of Continued Racism

By Shafiqa Ahmadi

Every year we take a trip to Las Vegas with my in-laws. On one of these trips, I took my two sons to the hotel pool. After swimming for a little while I noticed that my mother-in-law and father-in-law, who are African American, were sitting at a table next to the pool. I wondered why […]

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Change from the Inside

By Mark DeFusco

Some think that the For-Profit Higher Education Industry in the United States is on life support.  In May, Corinthian Colleges, filed for Chapter 11 protection and closed its doors, leaving thousands of students without a college to go to and millions (perhaps billions) of dollars in loans for the government to forgive.  The largest and best […]

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The Veil of Perfection: Academic (In)Vulnerability

By Antar Tichavakunda

In light of the blog I posted last week, I started to think about constructive ways to think about talking about race, racism, and seemingly difficult topics. I want to be clear, I’m not writing this as a pundit on race or Black Studies, because I’m not—I’m writing this simply as a Black man. There […]

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